Four NRL agents raided by NSW fraud squad as part of Parramatta investigation

first_imgPolice confirmed raids were underway at businesses in the CBD, Woollahra and Leichhardt on Thursday morning. The raids were being conducted in relation to Strike Force Rhodium, a NSW police spokeswoman said.No arrests are expected and no further comment will be made, police said.Officers from the NSW Fraud and Cybercrime Squad arrived at the properties with search warrants just after 9.30am.It’s believed the raids were carried out to seize contracts for NRL players, past and present, according to the Seven Network.last_img read more

Overcoming Phase 1 Delays: The Critical Component of Obstetric Fistula Prevention Programs in Resource-Poor Countries

first_imgPosted on July 25, 2012August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth recently published a commentary titled, Overcoming phase 1 delays: the critical component of obstetric fistula prevention programs in resource-poor countries that discusses fistula prevention in developing countries and takes a closer look at the factors that delay treatment of prolonged labor.Take a look at the abstract here:BackgroundAn obstetric fistula is a traumatic childbirth injury that occurs when labor is obstructed and delivery is delayed. Prolonged obstructed labor leads to the destruction of the tissues that normally separate the bladder from the vagina and creates a passageway (fistula) through which urine leaks continuously. Women with a fistula become social outcasts. Universal high-quality maternity care has eliminated the obstetric fistula in wealthy countries, but millions of women in resource-poor nations still experience prolonged labor and tens of thousands of new fistula sufferers are added to the millions of pre-existing cases each year. This article discusses fistula prevention in developing countries, focusing on the factors which delay treatment of prolonged labor.DiscussionObstetric fistulas can be prevented through contraception, avoiding obstructed labor, or improving outcomes for women who develop obstructed labor. Contraception is of little use to women who are already pregnant and there is no reliable screening test to predict obstruction in advance of labor. Improving the outcome of obstructed labor depends on prompt diagnosis and timely intervention (usually by cesarean section). Because obstetric fistulas are caused by tissue compression, the time interval from obstruction to delivery is critical. This time interval is often extended by delays in deciding to seek care, delays in arriving at a hospital, and delays in accessing treatment after arrival. Communities can reasonably demand that governments and healthcare institutions improve the second (transportation) and third (treatment) phases of delay. Initial delays in seeking hospital care are caused by failure to recognize that labor is prolonged, confusion concerning what should be done (often the result of competing therapeutic pathways), lack of women’s agency, unfamiliarity with and fear of hospitals and the treatments they offer (especially surgery), and economic constraints on access to care.SummaryWomen in resource-poor countries will use institutional obstetric care when the services provided are valued more than the competing choices offered by a pluralistic medical system. The key to obstetric fistula prevention is competent obstetrical care delivered respectfully, promptly, and at affordable cost. The utilization of these services is driven largely by trust.Read the full commentary here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more