LAMCO to Retake Mount Nimba Concession?

first_imgReports filtering into Nimba County suggest that the Liberia – America Mining Company formerly LAMCO is said to be coming back to take possession of Mount Nimba Concession from the world steel giant Arcelor Mittal which is currently in charge of the concession.According to some residents in Yekapa and some employees presently working with Mittal, the steel company is scaling down operations gradually owing to the news of LAMCO resurfacing to retake their old concession.Unconfirmed reports said that LAMCO and the Government of Liberia signed a concession agreement for 75 years beginning in the early 60s after the exploration of the mountain followed by mining and subsequent shipment of ore in 1965.The reports added that based on the concession agreement, there have been a series of meetings among former LAMCO investors in Europe who intend to return to Liberia and retake the concession.“We are hearing of LAMCO coming back so things are not so good now in Yekapa because Mittal is slowing down some activities,” said one Bigboy, a government security officer. It is not clear whether the news is true or false, but the movement of trains is said to be slowing down gradually according to citizens living along the railroad.But, a prominent son of Nimba who is also a former employee of LAMCO and now serves as County Inspector, Thomas Q. Suah, disputed the rumor saying, “I don’t think LAMCO will ever come back because LAMCO sold its share of the company to the Liberian Government for US$ 1 in 1989 and gave the government US$ 8million for any claims.”He said that upon turning over the concession to the government of Liberia, the company was called LIMCO or Liberia Mining Company.Suah added that LIMCO operated the company until the 16 year war erupted and everybody fled from the concession area in the early 1990sRegarding the slowing down of trains, one of the Mittal rail workers who asked not to be named, said the slowdown was due to lack of iron to be transported.He said production at the mine was slow owing to the breakdown of most of the machines that were operating in the mine.However, when contacted the Communications Manager of Mittal, Hesta Pearson Baker, described the report as false and misleading.Some observers believe that the reports emerged because of the company’s failure to rehabilitate the town of Yekapa almost 10 years after they took over.Mittal and the Government of Liberia reached a Mineral Development Agreement in the year 2005 and the company began shipment of ore in September 2011. But where the news started regarding the old concession company LAMCO coming back is yet to be established.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Worst Season for Ozone in Houston Maybe Right Now

first_img Listen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /01:03center_img When air pollution from cars and industrial plants gets cooked by the sun it forms ozone. Breathing it can cause muscles in your airways to constrict.Loren Raun knows exactly what that will do some people in Houston.“We looked at ambulance data, “ says Raun, an environmental scientist at both the City of Houston and Rice University.    A few years ago, Raun and and a team of researchers used 911 data and found that even just moderately high ozone for a few days increased the risk of asthma attacks by up to 45 percent. Heart attacks went up four percent even with just a few hours of elevated levels.“It affects, both, all ages, children pediatrics with asthma and affects the older population with cardiac arrest,” Raun tells News 88.7.Raun said while many of us might think smog is worse in the summer, she says their research found that people got sick from it more when the seasons change.“If you were to look at the statistics at the ambulance treated asthma attacks for example you will see spikes that occur in the fall and in the spring,” says Raun.And so far this month, each day has shown elevated ozone in many parts of the Houston region with the highest spikes that exceed new, federal standards occurring on Houston’s west side and into Fort Bend County. Dave FehlingHouston does not meet US EPA limits for ozone pollution. Sharelast_img read more