Bandits cart off firearm, $2M cash

first_imgCorentyne robbery…– key suspect arrestedBandits on Wednesday evening broke into a Corentyne home and carted off a quantity of gold jewelry, foreign and local currencies, and a licensed firearm.The incident took place at Lot 208 Mandir Street, Clifton Settlement Tain, Corentyne, Region Six (East Berbice/Corentyne).The intruders removed two sets of foreign currency totalling US $3,150 along withBhagwandin Mukhram$300,000 Guyana dollars. The jewelry stolen is valued at $900,000. No one was at home at the time of the incidentAccording to Bhagwandin Mukhram, also called ’40-11’, a mechanic, he and his wife left home at about 19:00h and returned four hours later when the discovery was made.The 63-year-old man said when he got home he went straight to the front door and opened the padlock.“After I open the padlock, I pull the door and noticed it bolt from inside. So I go around to the back and I see the bottom half of the door opened.”The man related that as he proceeded to enter the house, he stepped in six inches of water. He revealed that the pipes at two sinks were turned on and left running.“When I see that happen downstairs, my mind run straight on the firearm, and so I run upstairs; and when I go in the bedroom, the safe open and there is no firearm inside,” he related.It was a Remington semi-automatic shotgun which he had since 2003.According to Mukhram, entry to the building was gained by using an object to wrench open the door. This publication was shown marks on the door, indicating the way the intruders had gained entry.The Police were summoned, and as they commenced investigation, they went to the home of the suspect, situated three houses away and next to where Mukhram and his wife were being entertained by a neighbour.Initially, the investigators got no response when they went to the house, but after threatening to break the door, the lone occupant opened the door.The building was searched for items which were removed from Mukhram premises. Nothing was found, but a chisel and a hammer were removed from the house.The items match the marks left on Mukhram’s door.last_img read more

Cataract surgeries not being offered at ophthalmology centre

first_imgThe National Ophthalmology Centre at Port Mourant, Berbice, has the capacity to perform hundreds of cataract surgeries but currently because of poor budgeting, the Centre had not conducted any for the past three years.The $140 million facility at Port Mourant was commissioned in July 2009 and was the first specialised Ophthalmology centre in the Caribbean and Latin America.Head of the Regional Health Committee Zamal Husain admits that the institution is operating way below its capacity. In fact, there are no cataract surgeries done over the past three years.In May, Public Health Minister Volda Laurence announced that shortly the Centre will recommence cataract surgeries. Five months after, nothing has happened.Hussain, who was addressing the issue at the RDC said the institution has the capacity to carry out hundreds of cataract surgeries.Relating to figures, Hussain noted after its first 10 months of operation, there were 21,074 persons seen at the Centre.He noted that 8932 were seen for refractive errors of the eye. One thousand five hundred and thirty-six surgeries were done, of which 316 were cataract surgeries.“This hospital had the capacity to do about 10,000 surgeries and if we leave this very important Ophthalmology hospital nonfunctional, imagine what will happen to the people of Guyana.”The National Ophthalmology Centre has been out of kits to perform cataract surgeries for more than two years. Region Six Chairman David Armogan says that is so because of poor budgeting.However, Director of Regional Health Services, Jevaughn throws the blame on Central Government, saying it does not fall under the regional administration. He added that it is the Public Health Ministry that is tasked with providing drugs and medical supplies and also to ensure that the national ophthalmology hospital is up and running.The Cuban Government had funded the facility for nationals of the Caribbean Community (Caricom). Armogan, who was at that time the head of the Regional Health Committee and also the President of the Rotary Club of New Amsterdam which was instrumental in arranging and facilitating some of the surgeries of the Centre, says the National Ophthalmology Centre at Port Mourant should be up and running.He recalled that an Indian national was brought to the Ophthalmology hospital and was performing 40 surgeries per day.Armogan also noted that another surgeon, who is currently attached to the New Amsterdam Hospital, performs 10 cataract surgeries per day. (Andrew Carmichael)last_img read more