21 days agoAC Milan boss Giampaolo: Players must give their lives for the shirt, not for me

first_imgAC Milan boss Giampaolo: Players must give their lives for the shirt, not for meby Carlos Volcano21 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan boss Marco Giampaolo is not seeking excuses for their start of the season.Giampaolo’s job is on the line facing Genoa this weekend.He said, “After four defeats in six games it is normal that everything is black. Even in this case we must have balance, I don’t think it’s time to make definitive judgments. “I know that the team has a lot of room for improvement, especially from the mental point of view, learning to do certain things in a certain way.”The players have to give their lives for the shirt, not for me. The team believed and believes in my ideas. “You have to be strong in defeats, you have to suffer and be attentive to details.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Devin Gardner Responds To Teammate Devin Funchess’ Dunk Video With One Of His Own

first_imgView of a Michigan Wolverines football helmet before their game against the Utah Utes.SALT LAKE CITY, UT – SEPTEMBER 3: View of a Michigan Wolverines football helmet before their game against the Utah Utes at Rice-Eccles Stadium on September 3, 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Photo by Gene Sweeney Jr/Getty Images)Apparently wide receiver Devin Funchess is not the only recent Michigan football player who can throw down. After seeing Funchess’ impressive dunk on Instagram on Sunday, quarterback Devin Gardner decided to make one of his own.Gardner’s dunks are definitely impressive, especially for someone who focuses on another sport, but we’ll have to award this impromptu Wolverine dunk contest to Funchess. That vertical leaping ability is sure to impress NFL scouts in the coming weeks during the combine and other draft preparation events.last_img read more

PHOTOS: Signing of Condolence Book in Memory of Former Prime Minister the Most Hon. Edward Seaga

first_imgMinister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, signs the Condolence Book for the former Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Edward Seaga, at Gordon House today (June 4). Mr. Seaga was 89 years old when he died on May 28. Leader of the Opposition, Dr. Peter Phillips, signs the Condolence Book for the former Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Edward Seaga, at Gordon House today (June 4). Mr. Seaga died on May 28 at the age of 89.last_img

Man charged with killing romantic partner and her two teens in Ajax

first_imgAJAX, Ont. – A burly man, his face bruised and bloodied, appeared in an Ontario court on Thursday accused of killing a woman he was in a relationship with and two of her teenaged children.While investigators working behind yellow tape scoured the woman’s double-storey home on an otherwise quiet street in Ajax, Ont., Cory Fenn, 29, was arraigned in court in nearby Oshawa, Ont., on three second-degree murder charges.Police identified the victims as Krassimira Pejcinovski, 39, her son Roy Pejcinovski, 15, and daughter Venallia Pejcinovski, 13, all of Ajax.Dressed in a blue T-shirt and grey track pants, a handcuffed Fenn looked around the courtroom but said nothing apart from his name and “yes” when the justice of the peace said he should ask for medical attention when he returned to jail.Fenn was remanded in custody until an appearance by video on March 29.“I know that (Fenn) was involved in a relationship with … Krassimira Pejcinovski,” Durham regional police Const. George Tudos said Thursday. “There’s some history there.”Fenn was arrested Wednesday night, hours after police found the victims with “obvious signs of trauma” in their home.Pejcinovski and her son were dead when officers arrived, while Venallia Pejcinovski was rushed to hospital with critical injuries and died later Wednesday, police said.Krassimira Pejcinovski’s oldest daughter, a 16-year-old, was not home at the time of the incident and has been reunited with her father, police said.Fenn was known to police before the incident. He had been convicted of assaulting a police officer, for which he was given a suspended sentence and 12 months probation in 2009, court officials said.He was also convicted of mischief and given a suspended sentence, 12 months probation and ordered to pay $205 in restitution following a conviction for mischief in 2011.Details of exactly what led to those convictions were not immediately available.On his Facebook page, Fenn lists the Toronto District School Board as his employer, but the board said it could not confirm he worked for them, referring all questions regarding the case to police. Tudos would not comment on Fenn’s employment.Neighbours and other well-wishers left a small pile of flowers and cards outside the family’s home on Thursday. Tudos said the family was well-regarded.“I know that they were very well-liked within the community,” he said. “We have a lot of people, a lot of community members that have been sending their condolences.”Roy Pejcinovski, who excelled at hockey, was a Grade 9 student at Crestwood Preparatory College in Toronto, said Vince Pagano, the school’s headmaster.“I don’t know how many totally-loved kids each school has (but) I can assure you that he was one of ours … People were just constantly talking about his kindness to them,” Pagano said. “In honour of Roy and what he and his family meant to the Crestwood, the school has volunteered financial assistance in paying for the funerals.”Pagano said he only met Krassimira Pejcinovski once or twice at parent-teacher interviews, but found her to be kind and charming.“(She was) a loving young mother who should have been given a lot more life to do that with,” Pagano said.The staff of a Toronto minor hockey team said Roy Pejcinovski was a star goalie with the major bantam AAA Don Mills Flyers, which is in the city finals to qualify to represent the Greater Toronto Area for the provincial championship.Grief counsellors broke the news of the boy’s death to his teammates Wednesday night, team officials said, noting the teen was a prospect in next year’s Ontario Hockey League draft.“It was very tough on all of them,” team manager Nick Slawson said. “Roy was extremely well-liked, very, very popular.”Slawson, who had known the teen since the boy was seven years old, said Pejcinovski was a skilled and determined player.“The kid was a little undersized for a goaltender by today’s standards, but it didn’t deter him at all,” he said. “One of the nicest, and gentlest boys you’d ever want to meet.”The team’s Friday night game has been cancelled, but a session with grief counsellors was held again Thursday evening, said Don Mills Flyers president Peter MacInnis.He said the team will continue to play Sunday as they try to qualify to represent the Greater Toronto Area for the provincial championship.“The boys and the parents feel it would be best for the boys to get back at it. We agree,” MacInnis said in an email Thursday night.Police have not said how the Pejcinovskis died, but have noted that autopsies were expected within a day or so.“As soon as we get those results back we’ll have a better understanding of how they died,” Tudos said.Police said they were alerted to Wednesday’s incident after a woman stopped by to check on Krassimira Pejcinovski but a man barred her from entering the home. Officers said the man left in a vehicle that was later found abandoned.— with files from Peter Goffin in Toronto.last_img read more

Bell Media Congratulates Film and Television Production Partners on 203 Nominations for

first_img Facebook TORONTO, Jan. 16, 2018 – Bell Media congratulates its production partners, internal team members, talent, and all those involved in the creation of its television series and films nominated for the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards. Announced earlier today, Bell Media garnered 203 total nominations, comprising 134 television and digital nominations and 69 nominations for Bell Media-supported films. Bell Media is proud to continue to be the Premium Partner of the Canadian Screen Awards.“It’s a tremendous honour to be recognized by the Academy with 203 nominations,” said Randy Lennox, President, Bell Media. “These accolades are a testament to the boundless creativity and dedication of Bell Media’s partners and team members and the industry as a whole, and we are proud to play a part in the exceptional television series and films developed right here in Canada.”Bell Media received nominations in a wide variety of genres, including drama, comedy, and reality programming:CTV’s acclaimed Canadian drama series CARDINAL, from JCardinal Productions Inc., received the most nominations for Bell Media with 12, highlighted by a nomination for Best Limited Series or Program, as well as Best Lead Actor, Drama Program or Limited Series for Billy Campbell, and Best Lead Actress, Drama Program or Limited Series for Karine VanasseCraveTV Original Series LETTERKENNY, from New Metric Media, garnered nine, including Best Comedy Series and Best Lead Actor, Comedy for Jared KeesoThe final season of Space’s critically acclaimed, award-winning sci-fi drama ORPHAN BLACK from Temple Street Productions, received six nominations, including for four-time Canadian Screen Award winner Tatiana Maslany for Best Lead Actress, Drama SeriesCTV’s hit drama 19-2, from Sphère Média Plus and Echo Media, received six nominations, including Best Drama SeriesDiscovery’s original scripted series FRONTIER, from Take The Shot Productions and their partners at ASAP Entertainment, received five, including Best Costume Design and Best Photography, DramaCTV’s THE AMAZING RACE CANADA, from Insight Productions, received seven nods including Best Reality/Competition Program or Series; CTV’s original mystery series THE DISAPPEARANCE scored four nominations; and MASTERCHEF CANADA, from Proper Television, earned two nominations LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment On the strength of its unparalleled roster of championship events and diversity of programming, TSN, Canada’s Sports Leader, received 19 nominations for its live sports coverage and feature programming, more than all other sports broadcasters combined. TSN received five nominations for its exclusive live coverage of the 2016 GREY CUP, watched by 10 million Canadians.CTV News received 17 nominations, including three for CTV NATIONAL NEWS WITH LISA LAFLAMME for Best National Newscast; Best Reportage, National for “East African Hunger Crisis”; and Best News Anchor, National for LaFlamme. CTV News was also recognized with two nominations for Best News Special, for “Prince Harry: Journey to Invictus” and “Vimy Remembered.” W5, the longest-running newsmagazine/documentary program in North America, received eight nominations, including Best News or Information Series; Best News or Information Program for “48 Hours”; and Best Host or Interviewer in a News or Information Program or Series for Jon Woodward. CTV NEWS TORONTO AT SIX has been nominated for four awards, including Best Local Newscast; Best News Anchor, Local for Ken Shaw and Michelle Dubé; and two nominations in the Best Reportage, Local category for Austin Delaney and Tracy Tong.Television productions supported by premium pay TV network The Movie Network received seven nominations, led by acclaimed action series ROGUE, which received nominations for Best Lead Actress, Drama Series for Meaghan Rath and Best Guest Performance, Drama Series for Richard Schiff.Bell Media Studios received eight nominations, including nominations for Best Talk Program or Series for THE MARILYN DENIS SHOW and THE SOCIAL; Best Host in a Program or Series for Marilyn Denis; Best Host in a Live Program or Series for Ben Mulroney, Danielle Graham, and Lainey Lui for their work on ETALK AT THE OSCARS; and two nominations for HOWIE MANDEL: A BELL LET’S TALK SPECIAL.Additionally, Bell Media scored multiple nominations for Best Live Entertainment Special for its presentations of the 2017 IHEARTRADIO MUCH MUSIC VIDEO AWARDS and THE 2017 JUNO AWARDS, as well as Best Variety or Entertainment Special for WE DAY 2016.Films supported by Bell Media are nominated for 69 Canadian Screen Awards, with Kathleen Hepburn’s Never Steady, Never Still leading the way with eight, including Best Motion Picture as well as Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role for Shirley Henderson. Support for films comes from The Harold Greenberg Fund/Le Fonds Harold Greenberg, as well as pre-buys and acquisitions from premium pay TV networks The Movie Network and Super Écran.The Canadian Screen Awards take place during Canadian Screen Week, which celebrates the best of Canadian film, television, and digital media from March 5-11, 2018.The full list of Bell Media television and film nominations includes:Television and Digital Nominations (134)CTV (47)CTV/Bell Media Studios (9)ETALK (2)Bell Media StudiosETALK AT THE OSCARSBest Host in a Live Program or SeriesBen Mulroney, Danielle Graham, Lainey LuiETALK’S ULTIMATE OSCAR GUIDE 2017Best Photography, Lifestyle or Reality/CompetitionDylan McNivenHOWIE MANDEL: A BELL LET’S TALK SPECIAL (2)Bell Media StudiosBest Talk Program or SeriesJohn Kampilis, Steve Jarman, Ken KatigbakBest Direction, Lifestyle or InformationGillian ParkerTHE MARILYN DENIS SHOW (2)Bell Media StudiosBest Talk Program or SeriesMichelle Crespi, John SimpsonBest Host in a Program or SeriesMarilyn DenisTHE SOCIAL (2)THE SOCIAL (1)Bell Media StudiosBest Talk Program or SeriesMichelle Crespi, Laura ScarfoTHE SOCIAL: CHRISTMAS WITH JANN ARDEN (1)Bell Media StudiosBest Variety or Entertainment SpecialMichelle Crespi, Laura Scarfo, John Kampilis, Steve Jarman, Ken KatigbakWE DAY 2016 (1)Bell Media StudiosBest Variety or Entertainment SpecialJohn Kampilis, Steve Jarman, Ken Katigbak, Marc Kielburger, Craig Kielburger, Steve SloanCTV Original Programming (38)CARDINAL (12)JCardinal Productions Inc.Best Limited Series or ProgramJennifer Kawaja, Julia Sereny, Jocelyn Hamilton, Armand LeoBest Direction, Drama Program or Limited SeriesDaniel GrouBest Original Music, FictionTodor KobakovBest Photography, DramaSteve CosensBest Picture Editing, DramaTeresa De LucaBest Production Design or Art Direction, FictionRob Gray, Dennis Davenport, Ian GreigBest Sound, FictionDavid McCallum, Goro Koyama, Jane Tattersall, Martin Lee, Nelson Ferreira, Paul Germann, Sandra Fox, Stacy CouttsBest Writing, Drama Program or Limited SeriesAubrey NealonBest Achievement in CastingJon ComerfordBest Lead Actor, Drama Program or Limited SeriesBilly CampbellBest Supporting Actress, DramaAllie MacDonaldBest Actress, Drama Program or Limited SeriesKarine VanasseTHE AMAZING RACE CANADA (7)Insight Production Company Ltd.Best Reality/Competition Program or SeriesJohn Brunton, Barbara Bowlby, Mark Lysakowski, Mike Bickerton, Sarah James, Kyle Martin, Robyn Bigue, Ann Camilleri, Guy Clarkson, Steff Millman, Catherine PetersenBest Direction, Reality/CompetitionRob BrunnerBest Photography, Lifestyle or Reality/Competition“Can I See Your Kuna?” – Ryan ShawBest Picture Editing, Reality/Competition“Finale” – Al Manson, Jonathan Dowler, Clare Elson, John Niedzielski, Jay Prychidny, Jordan Wood, Michael TersigniBest Picture Editing, Reality Competition“Who Wants To Be The Python?” – Michael Tersigni, Jonathan Dowler, Cynthia Flengeris, Clare Elson, David Yenovikan, Wesley FinucanBest Writing, Lifestyle or Reality/Competition“Can I See Your Kuna?” – Mark Lysakowski, Rob Brunner, Matthew HansonBest Writing, Lifestyle or Reality/Competition“We Just Saw Johnny Mustard” – Mark Lysakowski, Jennifer Pratt, Rob Brunner19-2 (6)Sphère Média PlusBest Drama SeriesJocelyn Deschenes, Luc Chatelain, Bruce M. Smith, Virginia Rankin, Josée Vallée, Greg Phillips, Saralo MacGregor, Jackie MayBest Achievement in Make-UpErik Gosselin, Edwina VodaBest Photography, Drama“Labour Day” – Ronald PlanteBest Picture Editing, DramaAnnie IlkowBest Supporting Actor, DramaBenz AntoineBest Supporting Actor, DramaDan PetronijevicTHE 2017 JUNO AWARDS  (4)Insight Production Company Ltd.Best Live Entertainment SpecialJohn Brunton, Barbara Bowlby, Randy Lennox, Allan Reid, Mark Cohon, Lindsay Cox, Pam De Montmorency, Tracy Galvin, Kristeen Von Hagen, Luciano Casimiri, Mark Vreeken, Howard Baggley, Simon Bowers, Doug McClement, Alex NadonBest Direction, Variety or Sketch ComedyDavid RussellBest Writing, Lifestyle or Reality/CompetitionKim Clarke Champniss, Jean PaulBest Host in a Live Program or SeriesBryan Adams, Russell PetersTHE DISAPPEARANCE (4)Productions Casablanca Inc.Best Limited Series or ProgramJoanne Forgues, Jean-Marc Casanova, Sophie ParizeauBest Direction, Drama Program or Limited SeriesPeter StebbingsBest Writing, Drama Program or Limited SeriesGeneviève Simard, Normand DaneauBest Lead Actress, Drama Program or Limited SeriesCamille SullivanMASTERCHEF CANADA (2)Proper Television Inc.Best Reality/Competition Program or SeriesGuy O’Sullivan, Lesia Capone, Cathie James, Marike EmeryBest Picture Editing, Reality/CompetitionDave McMahon, Miles DavrenCANADA IN A DAY (2)Screen Siren PicturesBest Direction, Documentary ProgramTrish DolmanBest Picture Editing, DocumentaryNick HectorSAVING HOPE (1)ICF Films Inc.Best Guest Performance, Drama Series“We Need to Talk About Charlie Harris” – Missy PeregrymTSN (19)2016 GREY CUP (5)Best Live Sports EventPaul Graham and Jon HynesBest Direction, Live Sports EventAndy BouyoukosBest Sports AnalystGlen SuitorBest Sports Play-by-Play AnnouncerChris CuthbertBest Sports Opening/TeaseCraig Chambers, Devon Burns, Troy Hacock2016 MLS CUP (3)Best Live Sports EventJim Panousis and Steve AbitranteBest Direction, Live Sports EventRichard WellsBest Sports Play-by-Play AnnouncerLuke Wileman2017 TIM HORTONS BRIER Final (3)Best Live Sports EventPaul Graham and Scott HigginsBest Direction, Live Sports EventAndy BouyoukosBest Sports Play-by-Play AnnouncerVic Rauter2017 IIHF WORLD JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP – Gold Medal Game (2)Best Sports AnalystBob McKenzieBest Sports AnalystRay Ferraro2017 TRADECENTRE (1)Best Sports HostJames DuthieRaptors Basketball on TSN (1)Best Sports AnalystJack ArmstrongJOURNEY TO THE GREY CUP (1)Best Sports Program or SeriesMatt Dorman, Kevin Fallis, Gino Zolezzi, and Gary HawkeLANCE STROLL: GROWING UP FAST (1)Best Sports Program or SeriesJosh Shiaman, Rick Westhead, Darren Oliver, Nigel Akam, Michael BananiTHE MISSION (1)Best Sports Feature SegmentJosh Shiaman, Brent Blanchard, Sid Bailey, and Gary HawkeSOUND OF THUNDER (1)Best Sports Feature SegmentMatt Dorman, Brent Blanchard, Devon Burns, and Kevin FallisCTV NEWS (17)CTV NATIONAL NEWS WITH LISA LAFLAMME (5)Best National NewscastLisa LaFlamme, David Hughes, Rosa Hwang, Allan Myers, Allan BlackBest News Anchor, NationalLisa LaFlammeBest Reportage, NationalMelanie Nagy, Jim HoffmanBest News Special“Prince Harry: Journey to Invictus” – Lisa LaFlamme, Rosa Hwang, Stéphane Brisson, Paul Flynn, Angelo AltomarBest News Special“Vimy Remembered” – Lisa LaFlamme, Rosa Hwang, Allan Myers, Scott Ferguson, Katie DammanW5 (8)Best News or Information SeriesAnton Koschany, Brett MitchellBest News or Information Program“W5: 48 Hours” – Jon Woodward, Brian Mellersh, Emma Jarratt, Paul Flynn, Anton Koschany, Brett MitchellBarbara Sears Award for Best Editorial Research“W5: Making a Terrorist” – Madeline McNair, Brennan Lefler, Victor MalarekBest News or Information Segment“W5: After Ebola” – George Reeves, Kayla Hounsell, André LapalmeBest News or Information Segment“W5: Creep Out” – Jerry Vienneau, Steve Bandera, Jon Woodward, Denis LangoisBest News or Information Segment“W5: The Forgotten” – Madeline McNair, Paul Flynn, Brennan Lefler, Kirk Neff, Kevin NewmanBest Photography, News or Information“W5: 48 Hours” – Jim HoffmanBest Host or Interviewer in a News or Information Program or SeriesJon WoodwardCTV NEWS TORONTO (4)Best Local Newscast“CTV News Toronto at Six” – Ken Shaw, Michelle Dubé, Sophia Skopelitis, Joanne MacDonald, Joel BoweyBest News Anchor, LocalKen Shaw, Michelle DubéBest Reportage, LocalAustin DelaneyBest Reportage, LocalTracy TongSpace (12)ORPHAN BLACK (6)Boat Rocker MediaBest Achievement in Make-Up“To Right the Wrongs of Many” – Stephen LynchBest Photography, Drama“To Right the Wrongs of Many” – Aaron MortonBest Picture Editing, Drama“To Right the Wrongs of Many” – Jay PrychidnyBest Visual Effects“To Right the Wrongs of Many” – Geoff D.E. Scott, Sarah Wormsbecher, Eric Doiron, Nathaniel Larouche, Anthony DeChellis, Katarzyna Cieryt, Aaron Wright, Kaiser Thomas, Jason Snea, Lon MolnarBest Writing, Drama Series“To Right the Wrongs of Many” – Graeme Manson, Renee St. CyrBest Lead Actress, Drama SeriesTatiana MaslanyORPHAN BLACK: The Game (1)Best Cross-Platform Project – FictionDavid Fortier, Ivan Schneeberg, Kerry Appleyard, John Fawcett, Graeme Manson, Bryan Winters, James Woods, Bryce Hunter, Mel Maduro, Anthony Godinho, Mackenzie Eaton, Nicolas Ilareguy, Elliott FienbergWYNONNA EARP (1)SEVEN24 Films Inc.Best Writing, Drama Series“I Hope You Dance” – Emily AndrasWYNONNA EARP Digital (1)Best Cross-Platform Project – FictionDaniel Dales, Jarrett Sherman, Alex Lalonde, Emily Andras, Jordy Randall, Tom CoxKILLJOYS (1)Boat Rocker MediaBest Visual EffectsMichael Gibson, Danny McNair, Anthony Patterson, Lara Osland, Shoban Narayanan, John Coldrick, Tony Cybulski, Pranjal ChoudharyDARK MATTER (2)Prodigy PicturesBest Visual EffectsLawren Bancroft-Wilson, Kerrington Harper, Erica Henderson, Justin Reimer, Armand Vladau, Henrique Reginato, Karina Partington, Paul Furminger, Tristan Patrick, Will WallaceBest Achievement in Make-UpLynda McCormackDiscovery (10)FRONTIER (5)Take the Shot Productions / ASAP EntertainmentBest Achievement in Make-Up“Keetom Takooteeoo Maheekun” – Elizabeth Kuchurean, Norma RichardBest Costume Design“Mutiny” – Michael GroundBest Photography, Drama“Wanted” – Glen KeenanBest Production Design or Art Direction, Fiction“Mutiny” – Gord BarnesBest Sound, Fiction“Cannonball” – Marco Dolle, David Yonson, John Elliot, Clive Turner, Alastair Gray, Orest Sushko, Janice Ierulli, Dave Johnson, Mark ShnuriwskyBUILDING STAR TREK (2)Yap FilmsBest Direction, Documentary ProgramMick GroganBest Writing, DocumentaryMick GroganFORT MAC WILDFIRE: ROGUE EARTH (1)Pixcom ProductionsBest Direction, Documentary or Factual SeriesJoe WiechaHEAVY RESCUE: 401 (1)Great Pacific MediaBest Writing, Factual“Anything Can Happen” – Todd Serotiuk, Catharine ParkeMAYDAY (1)Cineflix (Mayday 16) Inc.Best Factual SeriesAlex Bystram, Kim Bondi, Martin PuppCraveTV (9)LETTERKENNY (9)New Metric Media Inc.Best Comedy SeriesMark Montefiore, Patrick O’Sullivan, Jared Keeso, Jacob TierneyBest Direction, Comedy“The Election” – Jacob TierneyBest Photography, Comedy“Relationships” – Jim WestenbrinkBest Picture Editing, Comedy“The Election” – Christopher MnnsBest Sound, Fiction“Relationships” – Rick Penn, Jamie Sulek, Devin Doucette, Kieran SherryBest Writing, Comedy“Relationships” – Jacob Tierney, Jared KeesoBest Achievement in CastingJenny Lewis, Sara KayBest Lead Actor, ComedyJared KeesoBest Supporting or Guest Actor, ComedyK. Trevor WilsonThe Movie Network (7)ROGUE (2)Greenroom EntertainmentBest Lead Actress, Drama SeriesMeaghan RathBest Guest Performance, Drama SeriesRichard SchiffRUSH: TIME STAND STILL (1)Fadoo ProductionsBest Biography or Arts Documentary Program or SeriesAllan Weinrib, Pegi Cecconi, Ray Danniels, John Virant, Corey RussellBRACE FOR IMPACT (1)IncendoBest Supporting Actor, DramaEnnis EsmerVERSAILLES (1)IncendoBest Supporting Actress, DramaSuzanne ClémentTHE DEVIL’S HORN (1)Larry Weinstein ProductionsBarbara Sears Award for Best Visual ResearchElspeth Domville, Elizabeth KlinckFANatic (1)IncendoBest Supporting Actress, DramaKaty BreierThe Comedy Network (5)THE BEAVERTON (5)Pier 21 Films Inc.Best Sketch Comedy Program or SeriesLaszlo Barna, Melissa Williamson, Jeff Detsky, Luke Gordon Field, Nicole Butler, Kurt SmeatonBest Direction, Variety or Sketch ComedyShelagh O’Brien, Craig David WallaceBest Writing, Variety or Sketch ComedyJeff Detsky, Luke Gordon Field, Alexander Saxton, Jacob Duarte Spiel, Kurt Smeaton, Pat Dussault, Nile Seguin, Wendy Litner, Winter Tekenos LevyBest Performance, Sketch Comedy (Individual or Ensemble)Emma Hunter, Miguel Rivas, Aisha Alfa, Dave Barclay, Marilla WexBest Cross-Platform Project – FictionJonas Diamond, Catherine Tait, Laszlo Barna, Melissa Williamson, Lisa Baylin, Lora Campbell, Luke Gordon FieldBravo (3)THE KENNEDYS: AFTER CAMELOT (3)Muse EntertainmentBest Limited Series or ProgramMichael Prupas, Keri Selig, Jon Cassar, Stan E. Hubbard, Stephen KronishBest Costume DesignDelphine WhiteBest Direction, Drama Program or Limited SeriesJon CassarE! (3)REIGN (3)Take 5 ProductionsBest Achievement in Make-Up“All It Cost Her” – Jenny Arbour, Linda PrestonBest Production Design or Art Direction, Fiction“A Bride. A Box. A Body.” – Aidan Leroux, Joel Richardson, Rob Hepburn, Phillip BarkerBest Costume Design“Pulling Strings” – Meredith Markworth-PollackMuch (1)2017 IHEARTRADIO MUCH MUSIC VIDEO AWARDS (1)Bell Media – Agincourt ProductionsBest Live Entertainment SpecialJohn Kampilis, Steve Jarman, Ken KatigbakAnimal Planet (1)WILD BEAR RESCUE (1)Omnifilm Entertainment Ltd.Best Writing, Factual“A Cub with a Kick” – Jenypher FisherNominated films supported by Bell Media’s The Movie Network, Super Écran, and The Harold Greenberg Fund include:Never Steady, Never Still (8)Equity and development financing by The Harold Greenberg FundBest Motion PictureJames Brown, Tyler HaganPerformance by an Actress in a Leading RoleShirley HendersonOriginal ScreenplayKathleen HepburnAchievement in Art DirectionSophie Jarvis, Elizabeth CairnsAchievement in CinematographyNorm LiAchievement in EditingSimone SmithAchievement in Music – Original ScoreBen FoxAchievement in Overall SoundMatt Drake, Nate Evans, Christopher O’BrienHochelaga, Land of Souls | Hochelaga, Terre des Âmes (8)Equity investment by Le Fonds Harold GreenbergPre-buy by Super ÉcranAchievement in Art Direction / Production Design | Meilleure direction artistiqueFrançois SéguinAchievement in Cinematography | Meilleures imagesNicolas BolducAchievement in Costume Design | Meilleurs costumesMario DavignonAchievement in Make-Up | Meilleurs maquillagesKathryn CasaultAchievement in Music – Original Score | Meilleure musique originaleTerry Riley, Gyan RileyAchievement in Overall Sound | Meilleur son d’ensembleClaude La Haye, Bernard Gariépy StroblAchievement in Sound Editing | Meilleur montage sonoreClaude BeaugrandAchievement in Visual Effects | Meilleurs effets visuelsAlain Lachance, Yann Jouannic, Hugo Léveillé, Nadège Bozetti, Antonin Messier-Turcotte, Thibault Deloof, Francis BernardMaudie (7)Equity and development financing by The Harold Greenberg FundPre-buy by The Movie NetworkBest Motion PictureBob Cooper, Mary Young Leckie, Mary Sexton, Susan MullenAchievement in Costume DesignTrysha BakkerAchievement in DirectionAisling WalshAchievement in EditingStephen O’ConnellOriginal ScreenplaySherry WhitePerformance by an Actor in a Supporting RoleEthan HawkePerformance by an Actress in a Leading RoleSally HawkinsThe Little Girl Who Was Too Fond of Matches | La petite fille qui aimait trop les allumettes (7)Equity investment by Le Fonds Harold GreenbergBest Motion Picture | Meilleur filmMarcel GirouxAchievement in Art Direction / Production Design | Meilleure direction artistiqueMarjorie RhéaumeAchievement in Cinematography | Meilleures imagesNicolas CanniccioniAchievement in Visual Effects | Meilleurs effets visuelsMarc Hall, Jonathan Cyr, Emmanuel Bazin, Clément Natiez, Emmanuelle GillAdapted Screenplay | Meilleure adaptationSimon LavoiePerformance by an Actor in a Leading Role | Interprétation masculine dans un premier rôleAntoine L’ÉcuyerPerformance by an Actress in a Leading Role | Interprétation féminine dans un premier rôleMarine JohnsonIt’s the Heart that Dies Last | C’est le Coeur qui meure en dernier (6)Equity investment by Le Fonds Harold GreenbergPre-buy by Super ÉcranBest Motion Picture | Meilleur filmRichard LalondeAchievement in Direction | Meilleure réalisationAlexis Durand BraultAchievement in Editing | Meilleur montageLouis-Philippe RathéAdapted Screenplay | Meilleure adaptationGabriel SabourinPerformance by an Actor in a Leading Role | Interprétation masculine dans un premier rôleGabriel SabourinPerformance by an Actress in a Leading Role | Interprétation féminine dans un premier rôleDenise FiliatraultThe Breadwinner (6)Equity and development financing by The Harold Greenberg FundPre-buy by The Movie NetworkBest Motion PictureAndrew Rosen, Anthony Leo, Paul Young, Tomm Moore, Stéphan RoelantsAchievement in EditingDarragh ByrneAchievement in Music – Original ScoreMychael Danna, Jeff DannaAchievement in Music – Original SongQais Essar, Joshua Hill – “The Crown Sleeps”Achievement in Sound EditingNelson Ferreira, John Elliot, J.R. Fountain, Dashen Naidoo, Tyler WhithamAdapted ScreenplayAnita DoronCross My Heart | Les rois mongols (6)Equity investment by Le Fonds Harold GreenbergAcquired by Super ÉcranAchievement in Art Direction / Production Design | Meilleure direction artistiqueGuillaume CoutureAchievement in Costume Design | Meilleurs costumesBrigitte DesrochesAchievement in Music – Original Score | Meilleure musique originaleVivianne Audet, Robin-Joël Cool, Alexis MartinAchievement in Overall Sound | Meilleur son d’ensemblePierre Bertrand, Stéphane Bergeron, Shaun-Nicholas Gallagher, Maxime PotvinAdapted Screenplay | Meilleure adaptationNicole BélangerPerformance by an Actress in a Supporting Role | Interprétation féminine dans un rôle de soutienClare CoulterThe Ravenous | Les affamés (5)Equity investment by Le Fonds Harold GreenbergPre-buy by Super ÉcranBest Motion Picture | Meilleur filmStéphanie MorissetteAchievement in Direction | Meilleure réalisationRobin AubertAchievement in Make-Up | Meilleurs maquillagesÉrik Gosselin, Marie-France GuyAchievement in Music – Original Score | Meilleure musique originalePierre-Philippe CôtéPerformance by an Actress in a Supporting Role | Interprétation féminine dans un rôle de soutienBrigitte PoupartRumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World (3)Pre-buy by The Movie NetworkTed Rogers Best Feature Length DocumentaryCatherine Bainbridge, Christina Fon, Linda Ludwick, Lisa Roth, Stevie Salas, Tim Johnson, Diana Holtzberg, Jan Rofekamp, Ernest WebbBest Cinematography in a Feature Length DocumentaryAlfonso MaioranaBest Editing in a Feature Length DocumentaryBenjamin Duffield, Jeremiah HayesThe Man Who Invented Christmas (3)Pre-buy by The Movie NetworkAchievement in Make-UpSonia DolanAchievement in Visual EffectsGreg Behrens, Brendan Taylor, Jasmine Scott, Martin O’BrienAdapted ScreenplaySusan CoyneBon Cop, Bad Cop 2 (2)Supported by The Harold Greenberg Fund – French Language ProgramPre-buy by The Movie NetworkPre-buy by Super ÉcranAchievement in Make-Up | Meilleurs maquillagesMarlène RouleauAchievement in Sound Editing | Meilleur montage sonoreMarie-Claude GagnéIqaluit (1)Equity investment by Le Fonds Harold GreenbergPre-buy by Super ÉcranPerformance by an Actor in a Supporting Role | Interprétation masculine dans un rôle de soutienNatar UngalaqLe Cyclotron (1)Equity investment by Le Fonds Harold GreenbergAchievement in Visual Effects | Meilleurs effets visuelsMarc HallMeditation Park (1)Equity and development financing by The Harold Greenberg FundPre-buy by The Movie NetworkPerformance by an Actor in a Leading RoleTzi MaPorcupine Lake (1)Equity and development financing by The Harold Greenberg FundPerformance by an Actress in a Supporting RoleLucinda Armstrong HallIndian Horse (1)Equity and development financing by The Harold Greenberg FundPre-buy by The Movie NetworkPerformance by an Actor in a Supporting RoleSladen PeltierGoon: Last of the Enforcers (1)Pre-buy by The Movie Network and Super ÉcranAchievement in Sound EditingChristian Rivest, Antoine Morin, Thibaud Quinchon, Guy Pelletier, Guy FrancoeurAdventures in Public School (1)Pre-buy by The Movie NetworkOriginal ScreenplayJosh Epstein, Kyle RideoutLong Time Running (1)Pre-buy by The Movie NetworkAcquired by Super ÉcranBest Editing in a Feature Length DocumentaryRoland SchlimmeAbout Bell Media Original ProgrammingBell Media has commissioned some of Canada’s most-watched and most-acclaimed original programming, working with the best Canadian independent producers in the country. Hit series commissioned by CTV include the hit drama CARDINAL, the record-breaking THE AMAZING RACE CANADA and MASTERCHEF CANADA, new original series THE DISAPPEARANCE, THE INDIAN DETECTIVE, and THE DETAIL, and the upcoming international TV format THE LAUNCH. Among the original series on Bell Media specialty and streaming platforms are Space’s KILLJOYS and WYNONNA EARP; CraveTV hit comedy LETTERKENNY; Discovery’s first-ever drama FRONTIER; Comedy’s satirical news series THE BEAVERTON as well as the upcoming CORNER GAS ANIMATED; and multiple series and specials for food and lifestyle channel Gusto, including ONE WORLD KITCHEN. Discovery is also home to Bell Media’s hit factual franchise HIGHWAY THRU HELL, HEAVY RESCUE: 401, and CANADA’S WORST DRIVER, among others. Bell Media is one of the first media companies in North America to commit to producing all new original scripted series in 4K.About Bell MediaBell Media is Canada’s leading content creation company with premier assets in television, radio, out-of-home advertising, and digital media. Bell Media owns 30 local television stations led by CTV, Canada’s highest-rated television network; 30 specialty channels, including TSN and RDS, and four pay TV services, including The Movie Network and Super Écran. Bell Media is also Canada’s largest radio broadcaster, with 215 music channels including 105 licensed radio stations in 54 markets across the country, all part of the iHeartRadio brand and streaming service. Bell Media owns Astral, an out-of-home advertising network of more than 30,000 faces in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Québec, and Nova Scotia. Bell Media also operates more than 200 websites; delivers TV Everywhere with its CraveTV and GO video streaming services; operates multi-channel network Much Digital Studios; produces live theatrical shows via its partnership with Iconic Entertainment Studios; and owns Dome Productions Inc., a multi-platform production company. Bell Media is part of BCE Inc. (TSX, NYSE: BCE), Canada’s largest communications company. For more on Bell Media, please visit www.bellmedia.ca. Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Winter squash

first_imgby Kaitlyn Goalenphotographs by Jillian ClarkFolks, we’ve turned pumpkins into the Miley Cyrus of autumn eating. Once upon a time, pumpkins were cherished totems of the season, embraced with fervor by children in costumes. And while vestiges of that innocence still exist, popping up each Halloween like a Hannah Montana rerun, it’s been all but swallowed up by a new image: “pumpkin spice.” Like Miley’s wagging tongue, pumpkin spice follows us from latte to doughnut to beer. The flavor is ubiquitous and over-the-top, and tastes nothing like the ingredient for which it’s named. And that’s the shame of it, because actual pumpkins and their winter squash ilk (all part of the Cucurbitaceae family), should be the centerpiece of your cooking this month. No need to wait until Thanksgiving: make a pumpkin pie this weekend (and give it a twist by using coconut milk instead of the stalwart evaporated milk, or by throwing sorghum into the filling instead of granulated sugar). Swap out the butternut squash in your favorite soup recipe for an heirloom like red kuri squash or Jarrahdale pumpkin.Or do as I do: Let the natural vessel-like nature of pumpkins and squash work to your advantage by stuffing them full of your favorite things and roasting them whole. I like to mix stale bread with whatever is left in my fridge (the ends of a cheese plate, for example, or the last of a package of bacon), stuff the mixture into a pumpkin (or, for individual portions, acorn squash), top the mixture with cream, and bake until the squash is tender and practically melting into a cheesy, molten center.My comparison ends here: Miley, under all the pageantry and gyrating, has a killer voice. Pumpkin spice, likewise, harkens back to a vegetable worth honoring. Let’s get back to the source.Stuffed Acorn SquashServes 4This recipe is very much a template that can be customized to your taste. Swap the cheese (blue cheese would be delicious), swap spinach for kale, or bacon for sausage. You could even swap the bread for partially cooked rice; it’ll resemble a gorgeous risotto after being roasted.2 small pumpkins or 4 acorn squashSea salt and freshly ground black pepper2 tablespoons olive oil1 shallot, minced4 garlic cloves, minced8 ounces button mushrooms, thinly sliced3 sprigs fresh thyme2 cups cubed day-old bread (such as sourdough or country loaf)1 ounce sharp cheddar, cut into small cubes1 ounce Gruyere, cut into small cubes1 ounce Fontina, cut into small cubes3 slices bacon, cut into ½-inch pieces and cooked until crispy (optional)1 cup spinach leaves, torn into bite-size pieces (optional)½ cup heavy creamPreheat the oven to 350°.Using a sharp knife, make a circular cut around the stems of each acorn squash (as if you were carving the top of a jack-o’-lantern). Remove the tops, and use a spoon to hollow out the squash, discarding the seeds and stringy fibers. Season the insides of the squash with salt and pepper, and set the squash inside a 13-by-9-inch rimmed baking pan.In a large skillet over medium heat, add the olive oil. When it shimmers, add the shallot and garlic. Cook until the garlic is fragrant, about 2 minutes, and add the mushrooms and thyme. Cook, stirring, until the mushrooms have shrunk in size and are cooked through, about 8 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside.In a large bowl, combine the bread, cheese, bacon (if using), spinach (if using), and reserved mushrooms. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Spoon the bread mixture into the squash cavities, pressing down gently to pack. Divide the cream between the four squash, pouring it slowly into the cavity, then replace the squash tops.Bake for 90 minutes to 2 hours, until the squash is tender when pierced with a knife. Let cool for 10 minutes before serving.last_img read more

Shop local

first_imgphoto courtesy North Carolina State Archivesby Ernest DollarThis season, as you’re making your list and checking it twice, our area retailers would be grateful if you remember to “shop local.”  That didn’t used to be a matter of choice. Local was the only option, and in Raleigh, it was often a colorful one. Ernest Dollar, director of the City of Raleigh Museum, found this fascinating photo of one of Fayetteville Street’s early sellers of wine, oysters, cigars, and groceries.Bananas and other fruits hang in the windows of Antonio Leo Dughi’s store at 235 Fayetteville Street, around 1900.Dughi stands in front of his store with his son, John (far right), and a young Dughi child. Customers and store clerks stand to the left, as does as an oyster wagon pulled by horse named Nancy. The ice cream wagon on the right was pulled by horse named John.Dughi and his wife were forerunners of the great wave of Italian immigration to the United States in the late 19th century. Dughi arrived in 1875 and eventually settled in Raleigh, where he established a store in a cramped downtown building.Dughi’s wagons helped his store become wildly popular by delivering fresh seafood, produce, ice creams, and novelty items to families across Raleigh. The Junaluska sign on top of the building refers to a wine company by that name.last_img read more

Spotlight Beyond myth

first_imgCourtesy Jason CraigheadJason Craighead has long had a leading role in the Raleigh art scene as an an artist, as a member of the City of Raleigh Arts Commission, as a collaborative studio founder, and as a former gallerist. Now his reputation as a contemporary artist has grown beyond North Carolina. This fall, Craighead’s work made a splash with Beyond Myth, a solo show at the prestigious Cheryl Hazan Contemporary Art gallery in New York, and next month, he’ll have another solo show at Tinney Contemporary in Nashville, Tenn.Lately, Craighead says, his work has been influenced by myths of heroes and adventurers, those who “answer the calling within and venture down a path that is filled with challenges.” Bending Time (above), from his most recent body of work, reflects some of those ideas. “When we choose to seek our very own personal adventure and find our very own personal voice,” he says, “… our hearts have room to rise.”Jason Craighead’s work is represented locally by Flanders Gallery, 505 S. Blount St., flandersartgallery.com.His Nashville, Tenn. show opens Dec. 5 at Tinney Contemporary, 237 5th Ave. North, Nashville, Tenn.;tinneycontemporary.com. Read more about Craighead at jasoncraighead.com.last_img read more

Spotlight A room with a view

first_imgJillian Clarkby Mimi MontgomeryAs the city of Raleigh grows ever-faster, so does its number of visitors. One thing that hasn’t kept pace is the number of hotel rooms. A recent report commissioned by the Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, and the Downtown Raleigh Alliance says that the city needs more rooms to keep pace with demand.The new Aloft Raleigh, which opened this past October, is one of five new hotels expected to open by 2018. Geared towards the hyper-connected global traveler, the Starwoods Hotels-owned Aloft is a testament to Raleigh’s growing clout as a business hub. On Hillsborough Street across from the N.C. State bell tower, a healthy walk from downtown, the stylish 135-room hotel features tech-forward innovation and art, and holds events targeted to the young entrepreneurial crowd.The spirit of Raleigh is alive in two Thomas Sayre works – one an outdoor sculpture (shown above), the other an indoor installation incorporating clay from the North Carolina piedmont. The hotel’s collection also features pieces from nearby Roundabout Art Collective. The local food scene is represented by homegrown favorites like Gonza Tacos y Tequila and Jubala coffee shop; Videri chocolate is also a perk for guests. The WXYZ bar, which features an open-balcony view of Hillsborough Street and the downtown skyline, showcases Raleigh tunes with the hotel’s Live at Aloft Hotels music series. Guests who want to check the city out can borrow bikes.Aloft is betting big on the growth of the Triangle. A branch opened in Chapel Hill a few years ago, another in downtown Durham last fall, and a third is set to open near Brier Creek in the spring.2100 Hillsborough St.; starwoodhotels.com/alofthotelslast_img read more

A world apart

first_imgEmerson, a tiger, came from a roadside zoo in Missouri. It was shut down due to safety concerns after a volunteer went to the hospital with a bite wound supposedly from a dog, but actually from one of the zoo’s tigers.text and photographs by Nick PironioTucked away just off NC-64, between the town of Pittsboro and Jordan Lake, lies Carolina Tiger Rescue. To visit this 55-acre refuge for rescued lions, tigers, and other wildcats is to enter a surreal foreign land. More than 40 neglected or abused wildcats have found safety in this vast sanctuary, just down the road from the farms and churches that dot the otherwise-familiar North Carolina landscape. With their growls and roars, territory-marking scents, and majestic beauty, the place sounds, smells, and looks like a world apart.The entrance to Carolina Tiger Rescue.Carolina Tiger Rescue was founded in the 1970s as a research institute by UNC geneticist Dr. Michael Bleyman. His task was to breed keystone species (those that perform a crucial role in the life of a particular ecosystem) as a way to protect the population of those animals until their home habitats could support them once more. As time went on, the organization decided the need to breed wildcats was less important than the need to rescue abused and neglected wildcats.Roman, a lion, prowls about. He came to North Carolina from a rescue in Ohio that shut down due to lack of funding.How does a lion or tiger wind up in North Carolina and need rescuing to begin with? There’s an online market for these big cats, which are bred (often excessively inbred, resulting in deformities) to be sold for a profit. It’s made worse by the lack of state regulation on the ownership of a non-native species. Some counties in the state including Wake, Durham, Orange, and Chatham counties have made it illegal to possess these animals, but it’s usually only when these animals happen to be found – often in the wake of their owners’ brush with another law – that they are taken into custody.A note that was attached to Elvis, a serval, or medium-sized cat, when his owners left him at the rescue. The note documented his care, which Carolina Tiger Rescue realized was inaccurate based on the animal’s actual health.As I photographed the wildcats, many hobbled around in pain from arthritis caused by years of abuse. Some were declawed by their owners, or locked in small cages for long periods of time. Once-mighty creatures, they now live out their days riddled with aches and pains. Spending time with them – which I did several times over the course of the last few months – was both a humbling and disheartening experience. It’s no wonder the rescue, which employs 17 people, has a list of approximately 160 volunteers to help them care for these beautiful animals.Fenimore, a tiger, gives a big yawn. He was rescued from the same Missouri zoo that Emerson came from.But it’s not all sadness there. Many of the wildcats are still playful and energetic, despite their circumstances. Some even played a game of “hide-and-seek” with me as I tried to photograph them through the mesh of their spacious cages. Once, when I turned my back, a tiger named Madonna playfully pounced on the cage wall behind me.Madonna, a tiger, eyes the photographer from behind a tree.Still, they’re dangerous, and never in direct contact with any humans. And only half of the wildcats at the rescue are on view for what the organization calls “The Show,” which is what visitors see when they take a tour of the refuge. Those with anxiety or aggressive tendencies are kept out of view, and spend their time alone being cared for by the staff.After emerging from her hiding spot, Madonna reclines in her rescue’s habitat.Safety cages are scattered throughout the complex, and are used to protect people in emergency situations or any time a wildcat is moved.Elvis, a serval, in a contemplative pose.Tarzan, a lion, reigned over the first floor of a hotel in Mexico until he was one year old. When he became too large for that task, he was locked in a cage in front of the hotel that was 3-feet tall, 3-feet wide, and 6-feet long. He spent two years there, and now cannot stand up or fully extend his legs.Tarzan curls up for a late-afternoon snooze.Star, a cougar, gazes through a fence. Star came from a roadside zoo in Mississippi that was shut down due to numerous violations of animal welfare and human safety.Aria, a tiger, was a privately-owned pet in South Carolina for 10 years. She became sick, and her owner’s neighbors called authorities, who contacted the rescue. She was found to have a pancreatic deficiency that required a specifc diet. The family eventually gave her to the rescue so she could receive better care.The memorial gardens at the resuce, where each brick bears the name of a wildcat that has died.A well-loved toy.last_img read more

Best Local Biking

first_imgcourtesy Thinkstockby Mimi MontgomeryI’ve never had the best luck with cars. I actually consider mysself a good driver, but I seem to be a walking, breathing manifestation of an automotive Murphy’s Law: Anything that can go wrong will surely come barrelling toward me and usually in an extremely public setting. On my driving record we have: three failed driving tests; uprooted mailboxes; fender benders; countless keys locked behind closed car doors; an incident with a flying bug and an air conditioner (don’t ask); numerous expired registration tickets; several middle fingers administered by portly, aggressive older men who could clearly use a hug; confrontations with neighbor’s trash cans; dislodged door handles; and a brief run-in with a boulder that I still maintain was not my fault (it was a very ill-placed boulder).Considering my colorful automotive past, I was a little intrigued when I took my car into the shop to be repaired for a week (yes, you don’t have to ask – another fender bender). What would it be like to commute without a car in a city like Raleigh? I’ve often thought that the parameters of inside-the-beltline Raleigh were just small enough to be pretty conducive to getting around car-less. Sure, you may not want to walk everywhere, but most places are within a decent bike-ride’s distance, and they’ve already got all the painted bike lanes and sidewalks set up for you. It’s clearly a city that wants to be bike-friendly, so why aren’t there more Raleighites who travel by two wheels or two feet?It seems that most distances that people drive here are stretches that big-city dwellers would stoically walk or bike in a heartbeat. When I lived in Manhattan for a summer, I would walk 30 minutes to work every day in the kind of sun-beating heat that leaves you praying for a solar eclipse. I frequently showed up to work looking like I had just ended an eight-month sojourn in the Amazonian wilderness: I would stumble in everyday loaded down like an urban sherpa with my gym and work bags, sweating like a nervous pig in a steam room, and grimy head-to-toe with city sludge.It was either that or take the subway, which during that time of year was basically like submerging one’s self into the subterranean molten lava of the Earth’s core. In fact, I would have rather licked the concrete sidewalk in Times Square than spoon the subway passenger standing in front of me in that overcrowded, overheated catacomb. But the thing is, I couldn’t really complain. I was hardly alone in this endeavor; everyone did it. No one thought twice about a half-hour’s walk in the middle of summer to wherever you were going.Part of that has to do with practicality, yes – it’s extremely expensive to keep a car in a large city, much less grab a taxi everywhere. But I also think Manhattanites all know something that I didn’t fully realize until that summer: There’s a certain paradoxical stillness to commuting outdoors in a city, to finding yourself perfectly aware of and in contact with your surroundings. Traveling unencumbered from a car, I was forced to actively participate in the world around me, to see the Hare Krishnas chanting in Union Square, the Middle Eastern man selling bananas out of a cart on my corner, the woman who put fresh flowers out every morning in front of the local bodega. These were the talismans of my morning walks, my own personal New York souvenirs, the bits of life that ingrained themselves into my own existence – steadily, slowly – like water-worn grooves on a rock.At the risk of sounding like Thoreau on a Transcendentalist ramble, I will confess this: I am an American consumer through-and-through. I have the carbon footprint of a diesel 18-wheeler – there’s nothing better than hopping into my fuel-eating Jeep SUV, turning on the air conditioner full blast, drinking out of a plastic water bottle I probably won’t recycle, and emitting some serious greenhouse gases as I easily cruise to my next destination and the ozone layer slowly withers away above me. Of course I feel a bit guilty about this, but it’s the kind of guilt I feel when I don’t floss for a few days or purposefully “forget” to set the trash cans out before the garbage trucks come – a certain apathetic cringe and knowledge that I could do better, while ultimately allowing sloth convenience to reign.So, when my most recent car misadventure forced me to revert to my ancestral state as a weary bi-ped traveler, I got strangely excited. This would be kind of fun, I thought, my mind racing: There I’d be, biking to work on a beautiful spring day on a cute beach cruiser with an adorable little basket, wearing some sort of chic ensemble like Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday. As you’ve probably already guessed, that’s not how it panned out. Since I don’t own a bike of my own, I borrowed my roommate’s, who is a small, lithe girl about four inches shorter and 20 pounds lighter than I am. When I hopped on her bike, it groaned like an old Grand Canyon pack donkey resigned to the fact that it had to take another obese person on a trail ride. The bike sagged to the ground and my knees were practically up to my ears as I took off, low-rider style, down my street.I tried to practice some Zen mindfulness as I cruised down Brooks Avenue onto Hillsborough Street, doing my best to take in the spring morning and the sights around me. Look – there was a beautiful collection of spring flowers, and some pretty birds perched in that tree, and was that an early morning dew I felt softly misting my face? No – that was sweat. A massive quantity of sweat, spurting from my pores like a ruptured water pipe.As I cruised by the N.C. State belltower, the cars beside me slowed down to get a good look at the girl in the highly-bike-inappropriate summer sandals wobbling on a bike clearly made for an undersized toddler. It became apparent that even though there are lanes specifically denoted for bike riders on Hillsborough, the majority of Raleigh drivers are still confused and frustrated by bike riders. Many cars veered too close into my lane or just lurked slowly behind me, unsure of what to do. Honestly, the way some people stared, you’d think I’d decided to ride a unicycle topless through morning traffic.One of the good things about this commute, though, was that I gained some major street cred with the Raleigh hipsters. As I got closer to downtown, they began springing up like mushrooms in the grass after a rainstorm, easily identified by their rolled-up jeans, purposefully nerdy glasses, canvas NPR tote bags, sustainably sourced coffee cups, and Bernie 2016 campaign stickers. As I passed by on my eco-friendly steed, they gave me a cool, vaguely visible nod as if to say, “Right on, man. You’re one of us,” before whooshing off toward whichever local start-up or alternative coffee shop lay on the distant horizon. If they had seen me in my Jeep, they probably would have given me a withering glance and mentally condemned me for driving something not fueled by hemp-seed oil or recycled kombucha.My embrace by the hipster subculture aside, by the time I got to work, my knees were aching like a geriatric and I looked like I had just emerged from a swamp, with enough perspiration covering me for three grown men combined. And I still had to bike home at the end of the day!Was it worth it? Yes and no. Raleigh is definitely a bike-able city, although I wouldn’t necessarily call it bike-friendly. Sure, you can get around where you want to on a bike if need be, and there are a good number of painted bike lanes and sidewalks for your use, but I would say bike transportation is nowhere near an expected or accepted norm.But maybe it should be – ridiculousness follows me like an ever-persistent shadow, sure, but there was a stretch of time on my commute where things seemed to fall into place (however briefly). As I rode past the North Carolina Democratic Party building, that old, white house sitting full of history and charm, and down along the various shops and businesses that line Hillsborough Street, I had that feeling of shimmering, full joy that comes from knowing you’re exactly where you need to be when you need to be. We live in a great city, full of life, vibrancy, new things, and kind, interesting people, and getting to see it from a new perspective reminded me of that all over again.Outside of a car, you simply catch things you wouldn’t otherwise. For better or worse (for my own well-being and that of the city of Raleigh), I’m sure I have some more bike rides ahead of me. If you happen to pass me on the open road, give me a honk – I’ll be the grown adult with training wheels and a padded crash suit.last_img read more

Spotlight Shall we dance

first_imgPilobolus photo by Ian DouglasAmerican Dance Festivalby Mimi MontgomeryMovement is alive in the Triangle this summer when the American Dance Festival hosts its 83rd season in Durham June 16 – July 30. Heralded by The New York Times as “one of the nation’s most important institutions,” the festival, founded in 1934, aims to foster creative growth in the modern dance world by bringing together dancers, choreographers, and students to learn and practice alongside one another. This season, the festival will present 61 performances in 13 Durham venues by 26 companies and choreographers from Israel, Russia, France, and the U.S. Throughout, professional training workshops will be held for dancers, choreographers, students, and teachers from around the world at Duke University.The gathering also aims to have a local impact: ADF Project Dance offers creative movement workshops to Triangle students and distributes over 500 free performance tickets to local nonprofits. The group also partners with Durham’s Central Park School for Children to introduce dance classes as an alternative to more traditional physical education classes.Company Wang Ramirez photo by Frank SzafinskiThroughout the summer, ADF will also partner with lululemon for free, public yoga classes; lead free tours throughout the ADF school; host a children’s Saturday matinee series featuring especially imaginative performances to captivate little ones; and hold free movie screenings focusing on the relationship between body movement and cinema. Plus, through the ADF Go program, young art lovers between the ages of 18-30 can purchase a $10 ticket to any performance (barring Savion Glover and Jack DeJohnette June 20-21).Go big, go small, but definitely go. There are plenty of performances happening throughout the two months and it’s easy to take your pick. For a full list of performances, events, locations, and ticket prices, visit americandancefestival.orglast_img read more

Above it all Roofs with a view

first_imgThe pool at SkyHouse sits 23 stories above street level, making it the tallest all-residential building in Raleigh.by Jesma Reynoldsphotographs by Tim LytvinenkoIt’s a vertical world we live in, and Raleigh is going up. Young professionals and empty nesters are migrating downtown to live, work, and play, fueling demand for stylish residential projects that are reshaping our city skyline. Luxury projects like The Residences at Quorum, West at North, and SkyHouse offer owners the opportunity to live above it all in high-altitude dwellings with access to private rooftop pools and gardens. Other stalwarts like City Club Raleigh and the columnar Holiday Inn offer communal gathering spots for taking in the ever-changing views. Photographer Tim Lytvinenko takes us into this world of rarefied spaces, providing a bird’s-eye perspective of our city. Citrix employees enjoy a game of miniature golf on the rooftop course that can also be used for bocce, one of the perks offered by the tech company.Another Citrix bonus is the yoga studio, also on the roof, with aerial views of downtown.Tall glass buildings mean lots of glass to clean. Here, a window washer scales the face of the PNC building, the tallest skyscaper in Raleigh at 538 feet.Through the glass bubble chandelier of City Club Raleigh, a view looking east.A reflection of the chandelier in the Sky Ballroom of the City Club appears to hover over the city.The Hudson, converted from the old Belk deparment store on Fayetteville Street, has a roof terrace for its residents.The Raleigh skyline lights up as evening falls on the city.Spectators, seen reflected in glass, gather on the roof of SkyHouse to view Fourth of July fireworks.A Holiday Inn patron enjoys views from the 19th-floor bar and restaurant at the top of the iconic rotunda.At West at North condominiums on Glenwood South, residents take in a sunset by the rooftop pool.Humid summer nights bring evening electric storms to the city.A crowd gathers for happy hour beneath the 11-foot chandelier in the Sky Ballroom at City Club Raleigh. Located on the 30th floor of the Wells Fargo Capitol Center, the former Cardinal Club merged with the Capital City Club in 2014 and underwent a $3 million renovation.Downtown seen from the green-roof terrace at The Residences at Quorum Center. The 15-story building was completed in 2006 as one of the first mixed-use (residential and commercial) projects downtown.A young resident looks for fireworks on Fourth of July from the SkyHouse rooftop.Reflections create an illusory effect on the cityscape.Photographer Tim Lytvinenko captures his reflection from a balcony at SkyHouse.Downtown appears on the horizon as seen from the top of the CapTrust building at North Hills.last_img read more

Babylonian oasis

first_imgby Tina Haver Currinphotographs by Keith IsaacsThe zigzag of Capital Boulevard as it wends its way into downtown is often crowded, sometimes bumpy, and never particularly pleasant. But if you exit to the right just as Capital becomes Dawson Street, you enter a different world. There, behind brick walls and large wooden gates, is a retreat of swaying palm trees, crystal blue reflecting waters, and tufts of sweet jasmine curling their way up toward a terra cotta-tiled roof. It’s completely removed from the hustle and bustle of Raleigh’s main artery, and everyone is invited. But this oasis didn’t appear by magic. It’s the result of the vision, patience, and significant investment of one Raleigh man.“The whole design concept is that you are in somebody’s house,” says Samad Hachby, the owner of the pools and palms. He operates his Moroccan-influenced restaurant, Babylon, in the ground floor of the historic mill that anchors the space. “If you go to a house in Morocco, you have an interior courtyard for maximum light. You have water, you have food, you have booze, and it’s beautiful. But this place was a dump with no parking lot.”The courtyard has all the elements of a house in Morocco according to owner Samad Hachby – water, food, and drink – and anchors the historic Melrose Knitting Mill.Hachby, 44, left Casablanca for a stint aboard a cruise ship before relocating to North Carolina to attend N.C. State in 1998. He first noticed the 116-year-old brick Melrose Knitting Mill in 2004, before he opened Mosaic, a wine lounge perched on the corner of Jones Street and Glenwood Avenue. The knitting mill’s landlord, Abdul G. Zalal – or, as his friends call him, A.G. – was holding the building for a prospective tenant who wanted to turn it into a gym.“I kept walking by, and nothing was happening,” Hachby says. “So, one day (in 2009), I walked in and I said, ‘A.G., I am going to do this project.’ He said ‘OK,’ and we shook hands.”The mill had sat empty for years, and Hachby spent the next two and a half years making it restaurant-ready. That involved significant interior renovations, including replacing ancient wiring and plumbing. Hachby also made several trips to Casablanca to find the fittings he needed to create the place he envisioned.“I wanted a classic palatial ceiling that you’d find in Europe, southern Spain, or Morocco,” Hachby says, craning his neck to admire the handiwork. His dark hair and the faint beard are the same color as the espresso he sips to ward off an afternoon slump.“I went to Casablanca to find artisans who do work in Malaysia and Dubai. Forty men worked for two months on the tiles. They sent each piece separately – without instructions, of course.”Owner Samad Hachby.Signature dishes reflect Babylon’s unique atmosphere.By the summer of 2011 he was ready to open Babylon’s doors. It has since become a popular and cozy cavern for dining on braised lamb tagine or crispy margherita pizza. For four years, Hachby himself was at the helm of the kitchen. His goal was to create a menu to reflect the restaurant’s unique atmosphere, with Moroccan classics like hearty harira soup made from lentils and chickpeas, couscous topped with meats and vegetables, and tasting plates overflowing with hummus, eggplant, and marinated olives. Last year, Chef Jean Paul Fontaine stepped in as executive chef. He developed the menu for Babylon’s new outdoor kitchen and a satellite kitchen in a recently renovated upstairs event space.With plush, high-backed seating, a well-appointed bar and roughly hewn exposed beams, Babylon’s main room provides a rustic retreat. An adjacent room often used for parties features high ceilings with classic Moorish tiles and chandeliers that sparkle in the midday sunlight, while in a tucked-away library room, beams from the original factory hold cookbooks and magazines. Four hundred square feet of beige travertine marble cover the floors, blending with the brick walls.Hachby and his team had to lay each piece on the floor, like a jigsaw puzzle, and then mount the tiles on the ceiling one at a time from the center, radiating out. Hachby points to sections of brick where his crew – or previous crews before him – began construction, only to realize that continuing would compromise the structure or historical integrity of the mill. The building’s walls tell a story of half-starts in holes and patches.The interior of Babylon is exotic and dramatic.One floor above the tiled ceiling, the restoration of a massive events space, which hosted the Raleigh Food and Wine Festival in May, is finally complete. Hachby installed a second kitchen with direct access to the space, so his staff doesn’t have to clamber up and down the stairs from Babylon with piles of dirty dishes. Gorgeous rounded windows bathe exposed brick and wood in warm, natural light. Adjacent to the events space, a new tenant in Furbish Studio brings even more style to the historic mill.Textile roots Though the Melrose is now one of Raleigh’s loveliest treasures, it has been a long time in the making. The groundbreaking for the textile mill occurred in June of 1900, and the building was completed by October. The mill officially began manufacturing men’s wool and cotton underwear on January 28, 1901. Three years later, 85 employees – many of whom lived in small wooden homes around the property – were turning out 1,800 pieces of underwear a day.That same year, the Pullen Park Pool – the city’s first – brought an increased interest in swimming to the community, so bathing suits were added to the Melrose repertoire. The City of Raleigh ordered five dozen suits from the factory, which patrons could rent for five cents per visit.But the operations of the Melrose were short-lived. The knitting mill shut its doors in 1930, one year after the stock market crash that halted nearly all construction and commerce in downtown Raleigh. By the 1960s, two roofing companies were based at the property. In 1969, Abdul Zalal, a young recent immigrant from Afghanistan, came looking for a job.“I arrived and I asked, where is the office?” Zalal says today, gesturing to where one of Babylon’s massive wooden gates now hangs. With white hair and a white mustache, he exudes the same kind of rugged stateliness as the historic building he would later purchase. “It was a roofing company with 35 employees, but I went to the wrong one,” he recalls. “They still hired me, and I worked for $3 an hour.”A decade later, on June 8, 1979, he bought the crumbling Melrose Knitting Mill for $60,000. It was a good investment – the building is now worth about $1.7 million.Zalal’s first move was unsurprising: He installed a new roof to save the historic mill from further deterioration, then boarded up the windows. For years, it stood mostly vacant save for a collection of auto parts – you can still see the faint paint outline of the “Motorparts Warehouse” sign on the front of the building – and the parking lot was a pocked landscape.But in 2010, with the help and vision of Hachby, revitalization of the Melrose began in earnest. Zalal removed the old buildings that obscured the front of the mill, andinstalled 200 truckloads of dirt to level and pour the parking surface. With tenants Babylon and the housewares store Furbish, plus the second-story events space now complete, the Melrose Knitting Mill now buzzes with shoppers, diners, drinkers, and brides. “For 68 years, this building was vacant except for A.G.’s workshop and a stash for roofing cranes,” Hachby says, tracing his fingers along one of the mill’s solid wooden beams. “Now, there’s so much going on. It’s not vanilla. The building tells its story.”For Hachby, imbuing the historic mill with new vitality is a source of pride, and he keeps a collection of photographs from the State Archives close at hand. There are black and white snapshots of downtown Raleigh from the 1960s, the cobble of steel roofers’ buildings obscuring the beautiful brick facade, and even a photo from the early 1900s where the street is covered in mule-drawn carriages, the Melrose towering beyond a paving company that’s little more than a wooden construct with several smoking chimneys.With the renovations complete, Hachby is now turning his attention to travel and writing a cookbook centered on Moroccan wines. Even so, he’s committed to constantly improving his restaurant and the historic space.“You have to do things beautiful. It costs a lot of money, and a lot of people don’t want to invest in their businesses,” Hachby says. “But this is what drives the name Babylon. You had this crazy, macabre looking place, with this beautiful building rising up. Like Babel. It’s Babylon.”309 N. Dawson St.; babylonraleigh.comShekshoukaSamad’s favorite recipe: Shekshouka, a classic egg dish with spicy tomatoes and peppers. This is a one-skillet recipe of eggs baked in a tomato-red pepper sauce and onions spiced with cumin, paprika, and cayenne. Make the sauce first – it comes together fairly quickly on top of the stove – then gently crack each of the eggs into the pan, nestling them into the sauce. The pan is moved into the oven to finish.3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil1 large onion, halved and thinly sliced1 large red bell pepper, seeded and thinly sliced3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced1 teaspoon ground cumin1 teaspoon sweet paprika⅛ teaspoon cayenne, or to taste2 pints San Marzano tomatoes withjuices, coarsely chopped¾ teaspoon salt (to taste)¼ teaspoon black pepper (to taste)6 large organic eggsChopped cilantro, for servingHarissa for servingHeat oven to 375 degrees.Heat oil in a large skillet or tagine over medium-low heat. Add onion and bell pepper. Cook gently until very soft, about 20 minutes. Add garlic and cook until tender, 1 to 2 minutes; stir in cumin, paprika, and cayenne, and cook 1 minute. Pour in tomatoes and season with the salt and the pepper; simmer until tomatoes have reduced.Gently crack eggs into skillet over tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer skillet or the tagine to oven and bake until eggs are just set, 7 to 10 minutes. Sprinkle with cilantro and serve with harissa.Serves 4. Total time: 1 hour.Lamb shank tagine6 small frenched lamb shanks (5 to 6 pounds total)3 cups chopped yellow onions (2 largeonions)3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger1 ½ teaspoons chili powder1 ½ teaspoons ground turmeric1 ½ teaspoons ground cumin½ teaspoon ground cardamom1 (4-inch) cinnamon stick1 large can diced San Marzano tomatoes2 cups unsalted chicken stockA pinch of saffronPreheat the oven to 300 degrees. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a very large (12-to-13-inch) pot or tagine.Preseason the lamb shanks, then add to the pot and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes on each side. Add the onions and cook over medium-low heat until translucent and almost caramelized. Add the garlic, ginger, chili powder, turmeric, cumin, cardamom, and cinnamon so that the spices release their oils and merge with the onions. Add the tomatoes and their liquid. They will deglaze any stock you have in the pot. Put back the lamb shanks in the pot and cover with the stock. Cook for 90 minutes. Remove from the heat and let rest.Serve over couscous, risotto, or seasonal roasted potatoes.Serves 6.last_img read more

Aly Khalifa

first_imgAly Khalifa, owner and director of innovation, at Lyf Shoes at Designbox in RaleighTrailblazing shoe designerby Tina Haver Currinphotographs by Travis LongLast year at SPARKcon, downtown Raleigh’s annual festival of innovation and creativity, Aly and Beth Khalifa, local designers and entrepreneurs, had to apply to participate. The couple had that in common with 30 other hopeful applicants, but none of those folks also had “SPARKcon co-founders” on their resumes.“We weren’t sure we would get in,” Khalifa says, with a hearty laugh. “SPARKcon is all open-source and run by the people who organize it, so I had no say whatsoever.”Which is how the couple designed it in 2006, when they began the festival to celebrate Raleigh’s fashion week. After the first five hectic, successful years of running it – inventing and designing all the while – the pair relinquished management to the Visual Art Exchange, but not before expanding SPARKcon far beyond fashion to encompass film and technology, food and music, art and commerce. These days, the once-modest event transforms downtown Raleigh into a weekend-long hive of creative expression, with a pop-up bazaar, runway show with a sprawling City Plaza catwalk, improv comedians, and chalk art that stretches for as far as the eye can see.Aly Khalifa, owner and director of innovation, left, and Mingyn Lin, product designer and developer, work at Designbox in RaleighMaterials and patterns for Lyf shoesMeanwhile, the Khalifas are fully focused on launching Lyf, their own 3-D printed, custom-made, eco-shoe company in the heart of downtown Raleigh. Their status as festival founders gave them no free ride into the event’s Wear What You Are fashion show. But the couple needn’t have worried. Lyf was selected to become the first footwear company to debut in the Triangle’s largest annual fashion exhibition, which has emerged as a showcase for the area’s best up-and-coming jewelry, clothing, and accessories. Alumni include Raleigh Denim Workshop, Holly Aiken, and Lumina Clothing, putting Lyf in good company.Finding himself on the other side of the planning equation for the first time, Khalifa had to ask himself new quesions: What would Lyf’s models look like? How should they represent themselves as a company? “It was the first time we got to present the real package,” he says, “and it was great for us. It made us confront the brand.”That was nearly a year ago. This year, as the 11th annual festival gears up for its run from September 15 through 18, Lyf is poised for larger-scale production.Designbox beginningsIt all began at Designbox, the Khalifas’ creative incubator that, until this year, was located in the Warehouse District. Since 2003, Designbox has supported local startups with a collaborative workspace and small retail store. These days, Designbox rests atop Cafe Helios, and it’s where the Khalifas refine their newest endeavor: a line of custom 3-D-printed shoes.“For more than a decade we’ve had a 3-D printer working for clients. It’s amazing what we paid for the first one, and what a pain it was compared to new technology, which has become a lot simpler,” Khalifa says. “For the shoes, we’re using a lot of 3-D printing to do sustainable footwear.”That original ZPrinter allowed the team to go from design to prototype in three days. The team at Lyf now has five printers, and hopes to add seven more in the coming year. They’ve taken to naming the printers to quickly diagnose their quirks and variations (“Beethoven” is a particularly loud printer; “Mad Jack” is “rock solid.”)A 3-D printer prints Lyf shoe components at DesignboxFor now, the printers stack on top of each other, and if all goes to plan, the entire operation will eventually be mobile, like a food truck for shoes. Customers will get fitted in a standard pair of kicks, and then add their own customized art or design to the cotton canvas or leather. The shoes will then be assembled and ready for pickup in an hour. It’s a unique approach – but nothing new for the innovative couple.“In many ways, we talk about Lyf like we talk about SPARKcon,” says Khalifa. “If we put SPARKcon into a pair of shoes, what would that look like? Sensitivity to the environment, trying to stimulate the local economy, celebrating creativity, being a good product with good craft, all those principles are now in Lyf shoes.”One of the most intriguing prospects of Lyf is that sizes can be created and assembled without mass production, which means that someone with unusally sized feet, or feet of different sizes – one a size bigger than the other, for instance – could order a pair of Lyfs to fit them exactly. Khalifa estimates he has over 4,000 different size files available, and the number is growing.Finding a new wayThe impetus to design footwear evolved naturally for Khalifa, who worked at Performance Bicycle after earning dual engineering and product design degrees from N.C. State University. When he began designing footwear for cycling, Khalifa became “the guy who always had to be on the factory floor.” He didn’t expect an unintended side effect from his visits: an immediate, splitting headache from the toxic chemicals used in shoe manufacturing.Operations manager Joey Fralin preps 3-D printersKhalifa lays out the components of a Lyf shoeThe traditional system is inherently broken, he says: “We’re moving our footwear production with a level of ignorance, from the U.S. to Mexico to Taiwan to China to Vietnam to Burma. Each time, after one generation, people have a hard time recruiting because the toxic chemicals in shoe production can cause birth defects,” Khalifa says. “But that’s just one part of it. There are also 50 materials in an average pair of shoes.” That makes disassembling and recycling shoes nearly impossible, he says, because the cost of processing such a complex product is so high.Khalifa began to think about ways to do things differently.At Lyf, each of the shoe’s components are made of a single-source material, and the shoes are intentionally designed to come apart. Lyf also offers a 15 percent discount to customers who return their shoes after they’ve been worn. That results in a 15 percent return from its own supply chain, too, due to their materials’ infinitely recyclable nature. Khalifa points out the system is called a circular economy, where products are intentionally designed from the beginning with their entire lifecycle in mind.A Lyf shoe prototype made of 3-D printed components and recycled airplane seat material“By taking the material back, (manufacturers) don’t have to return all the way to petroleum or to the cottonseed, so it’s a really good deal for everyone,” Khalifa explains. “The trick is, the designer has to attach value after that first use. But, I think if you wouldn’t take it back, you shouldn’t put it out there. We’re designing so that when you buy a pair of Lyf shoes, the world gets better.”last_img read more

WINnovation 2016 at the Umstead

first_imgWINnovation speakers: Maura Horton, Cindy Whitehead, Isa Watson, Jamie Meares, and Tashni-Ann Dubroy.by Mimi Montgomeryphotographs by Joseph RaffertyAn enthusiastic group of 210 Triangle area women (and three men) gathered at the Umstead Hotel and Spa Sept. 9 for Walter’s second-annual WINnovation event, sponsored by Bank of America and the Umstead. Celebrating women and entrepreneurism in the Triangle, the sold-out luncheon featured TED-talk-inspired “WIN” talks by five local female innovators: Cindy Whitehead, co-founder of Sprout Pharmaceuticals and founder and CEO of The Pink Ceiling; Tashni-Ann Dubroy, president of Shaw University and co-owner of Tea and Honey Blends; Maura Horton, founder of MagnaReady; Isa Watson, founder and CEO of Envested; and Jamie Meares, blogger and founder and creative director of Furbish Studio.“Don’t run from the word no. This is where mere innovation is born.”–Maura Horton, founder of MagnaReadyEach woman shared stories from her own entrepreneurial journey, covering everything from resilience to ingenuity; how to overcome boundaries; the importance of confidence; and how to lean into change and move past failure.Isa Watson, founder and CEO of Envested, speaks to the audience.Cindy Whitehead, co-founder of Sprout and CEO of the Pink Ceiling, gives her WIN talk.“There’s always something significant that you’ve achieved time and time again when the odds were stacked against you – when you’re looking to do something bold, I think it’s really important to just block out all the noise.”–Isa Watson, founder and CEO of EnvestedBekay King, Shaw University studentKelly GuessFollowing the talks, the group gathered together on the stage to answer questions from the audience. Then, guests separated into groups to participate in breakout conversations focused on how to execute ideas, how to leverage local resources, how to return to work after a career break, and how to work entrepreneurially in any setting. These discussions were led by Gab Smith, executive director of CAM Raleigh, Teresa Monteiro, founder and CEO of Her Leap, Jenny Hwa, executive director of Innovate Raleigh, and Robin Costello, corporate relations director of the Council for Entrepreneurial Development.Bank of America executive Kathryn Black“You can’t be your biggest hater. There are tons of people in the world to do that for you. You’ve got to be your biggest promoter … be sure you maintain a level of confidence that will take you beyond the stars.”–Tashni-Ann Dubroy, president of Shaw University and co-owner of Tea and Honey BlendsEntrepreneur Andrea HoytBreakout session moderator Teresa Monteiro“(Be) daring enough to not be afraid of change, and to not even give the word failure any meaning to you. I dare you to fail – try it.” –Jamie Meares, blogger and founderand creative director of Furbish StudioDonna Preiss, founder and CEO of The Preiss Co.Holly HammerThroughout the day, a networking area sponsored by e51 and HQ Raleigh allowed attendees to create connections and exchange ideas, propelling the power of WINnovation beyond the day itself. This forward momentum was further evidenced in an invitation from Gab Smith for all attendees to reconvene in six months at CAM. A cocktail hour closed the day. Guests mingled with new contacts and the event speakers, reflecting the camaraderie and community spirit that makes Triangle entrepreneurship flourish.Speakers Maura Horton, Cindy Whitehead, Isa Watson, Jamie Meares, and Tashni-Ann Dubroy during the Q&A session.“Put the women at the center of any conversation, walk a mile in their shoes, and you can make pretty remarkable change.”–Cindy Whitehead, co-founder of Sprout Pharmaceuticalsand founder and CEO of The Pink Ceilinglast_img read more

A rock n roll revival

first_imgSam McDonald, Matt Thomas, Billy Warden, and Jeff Holshouser of The Floating Children, photo by Jonathan Drakeby Billy WardenNot even the makers of Viagra have pitched the restorative powers of their product as insistently as proponents of rock ’n’ roll.From Bruce Springsteen to Joey Ramone to Pink, billions of decibels have gone into claiming for the music the mantle of all-purpose elixir, mender of broken hearts, guardian of the faithful’s most delirious dreams.Truth? Hokum? This summer, I got my chance to find out.On the evening of April 20, while playing catch-up with another blown tax deadline, an email arrived from the organizers of the Be Loud! Sophie Foundation. Would my old band reunite for the foundation’s annual August fundraising extravaganza at the Triangle’s venerated mecca of indie rock, The Cat’s Cradle?The tax sheets melted away along with the political argument in the kitchen. The email swept me back to the riotous late-’80s heyday of The Connells, The Pressure Boys, The Veldt, Three Hits, and my baby, The Floating Children.Of course, a reunion was out of the question. Completely impractical. What with family obligations and business responsibilities. Naturally, I replied: “Oh HELLZ YES.”Now, a quick word on how ill-advised this may have looked to an outsider. The Floating Children were not a stand-and-strum band. A writer of the era described us as “the New York Dolls run amok in Pee-Wee’s playhouse.” We were an anarchic, confetti-spewing mayhem machine.So as I lay in bed that night, troubling questions commingled with chronic back pain: “How could a middle-aged reunion NOT fall flat?” “If my wife leaves me in shame, which car will she take?” And, “how to make a reunion count for something beyond nostalgia?”   The answer to the last question, counterintuitively, was to up the ante, heighten the risk. The next day’s proposition to the rest of The Floating Children included the reunion performance – plus, “how about we write new songs?”New tunes would mean stretching beyond old tricks. They would require creativity and commitment. They would be a more profound test: Did we still, somewhere inside, carry that spark of inspiration?The band didn’t balk. We went to work emailing lyrics and texting demos – me, Jeff Holshouser, Jody Maxwell, James Olin Oden, Steve Eisenstadt, and Larry Burlison in the Triangle; Sam McDonald and new guy Matt Thomas in Norfolk.Craggy reserves of creativitySure, everyone had jobs and workaday duties. But everyone also had craggy reserves of creativity to uncork. Two new tunes came together fast – and with considerably more melodic hooks than 25 years ago. I couldn’t vouch for each band member’s bodily fitness, but creatively we were in fine form.Soon, the rehearsals revealed our physical and emotional conditions. Physically, the eight of us looked to be a collective 90 pounds or so overweight – not exactly Olympian, but certainly respectable by middle-aged standards.Emotionally, we were a ragged parade of humanity straight out of a Bob Seger double album. Divorce, money woes, exhaustingly complicated bachelorhood, kid concerns – they were all in the mix. But none of it slowed us down. When we played, energy and optimism gushed.We recorded the new tunes in a daylong blizzard of missed notes, surging solos, profane pep talks, and tequila shots. Then came the show. Creating new music had limbered us up. We were rock ’n’ roll acrobats again. And when our original background singer and “dance diva,” Tracey Brown, entered the dressing room, confetti bucket in hand, we were beyond inspired.Backed by an overzealous fog machine operated by my first-pumping teenage son, The Floating Children ’16 put on what some longtime fans called our best show – period. And, by the grace of the rock gods, we picked up new fans. They included 17-year-old guest saxophone player Lee Sullivan, who noted approvingly, “Putting on weird clothes and playing freaky music. The Floating Children go hard.”Indeed, we did – and not just musically. There were ridiculous twirls and foolish shimmies and other moves that away from the adrenaline rush of the stage would land me in intensive care.I hugged each Floating Child at least 120 times that night. While every embrace was an expression of genuine affection, maybe I was also trying to get a firm hold of something more ethereal. The magic that generations of stars and nobodies had promised was real. I wasn’t 22 again; but nor was I the same harried businessman/dad I had been on the night the reunion offer arrived.As The Floating Children prepare to share those new tunes with the world via technologies that we couldn’t imagine a quarter century ago, I am – we are – back to square one. Hoping that a few folks out there get it and groove along. The gamble is electrifying. The secret, then, of rock ’n’ roll’s restorative power is simply, beautifully this: The risk is the reward. Billy Warden is the co-founder of the marketing agency, GBW Strategies, and an incorrigible song-and-dance man. The Floating Children’s new songs are available on Facebook, SoundCloud, and YouTube.last_img read more

Spotlight Warm from the oven wishes

first_imgcourtesy La Farm BakeryWith five bakeries in the downtown area alone, most of them less than a handful of years old, Raleigh has quickly become a destination for the gourmet baked good lover. Come holiday time, there’s something for everyone. An assortment of treats from Boulted Bread slivered into bite-sized portions would make a perfect cocktail pairing … a weekend morning stroll through the State Farmers Market would be sweeter with one of Annelore’s German Bakery’s spicy gingerbread cookies … a sticky toffee pudding-flavored macaron at Lucettegrace could turn an afternoon coffee break into a mini celebration … a crusty loaf of bread from any of these spots would make a perfect complement to a warm winter stew.Besides stopping in and stocking up, most local bakehouses have seasonal specials, too.Here’s what to plan ahead for. Boulted Bread provides rustic, hearty favorites. Last year’s spiced date levain was a hit and will be back; and there’s also old-fashioned apple and cranberry pies; crusty-sweet-croissant-y kouign-amann; and soft gingerbread. Order online or in-store between Dec. 2 and Dec. 18; 614 W. South St.; boultedbread.com Dewey’s Bakery is a seasonal taste of history. Many North Carolinians know the Winston-Salem outpost as the source of annual tins of Moravian sugar cookies; each year lately, the store opens a pop-up shop in Cameron Village from Thanksgiving to Christmas Eve. Alongside those wafer-thin sugar cookies are boxes of cinnamon-bun-esque Moravian sugar cake, pies and cakes, and Lovefeast buns, sweet yeast rolls with nutmeg, orange, and lemon. 421 Daniels St.; deweys.com La Farm Bakery and its breads are featured in this month’s “Favorite Things” issue of O: The Oprah Magazine. Among their celebrated goods are dark chocolate babka, the traditional Jewish dessert; stollen German holiday bread; linzer-inspired challah: challah bread filled with raspberries and cream; and fig-polenta-walnut bread. Just in time for winter orders, the popular Cary spot opens its second production bakery downtown on West Chatham Street this month, and a new cafe adjacent to it is under construction to open come spring. Order by Dec. 21; 4248 N.W. Cary Parkway; lafarmbakery.com Lucettegrace is for the elegant dessert lover. This year, the pastry shop is increasing its in-store packaged treats, including fudge and sweet granolas, for hostess gifts and stocking stuffers. There are also three bûche de noël French Christmas cake flavors to choose from and pre-order: Red velvet rolled with cream cheese mousse with raspberry jam; chocolate cake rolled in pecan pie mousse, set in chocolate mousse, and resting on chocolate brownie cake; and gingerbread cake rolled with lemon cream, set in chai mousse, and resting on more gingerbread. Order to pick up on Dec. 23 and 24; 235 S. Salisbury St.; lucettegrace.com Night Kitchen is where to find unexpected treats. Last year’s order-ahead, pre-wrapped assortment of homemade holiday cookies was popular and will again be an option; as well as linzertorte, an Austrian spiced nut pastry shell filled with raspberry and red currant jam; and panettone, an Italian celebratory cake studded with dried fruit. Order in-person or by phone by Dec. 20; 984-232-8907; 10 W. Franklin St., Ste. 140; raleighnightkitchen.comYellow Dog Bread offers baked goods with familiar Southern influences. Rosemary, cheddar, and pumpkin seed boule; yeast rolls; pumpkin walnut bread; and other treats are all available throughout the winter. For the holidays, the order-ahead selection includes salted pecan pie, cranberry apple pie, and sweet potato cheesecake. Order in-person or by phone by Dec. 21; 984-232-0291; 219 E. Franklin St.last_img read more

Being the change Exploris Schools awardwinning refugee project

first_imgExploris student Warren Gray delivers fresh kale to Ni Ni Myint, whose lack of access to healthy food inspired an award-winning project. Photograph by Sonja McKayby Settle MonroeA group of students and teachers from downtown Raleigh’s The Exploris School recently set out on a simple mission – to be the change they wanted to see in the world. They kept their focus local, and worked as a team to help Burmese refugees living in Raleigh. What they didn’t know was that their work here at home would gain them recognition on a world stage. The team of 18 fourth and fifth graders were participants in a global program called Design for Change that teaches children how to impact their communities for the better. They started by researching problems plaguing their community. When they learned of a nearby neighborhood with refugees in need of fresh produce, they knew they had found their cause.  Their solution was so impressive, and so simple and replicable, that it was recognized as the top Design for Change project in the nation. Last December, three of the students on the Exploris team and four of their teachers traveled to Beijing, China to represent the United States and present the project to teams from 40 countries at the worldwide Be the Change conference. “We didn’t know we would get to go to China when we started helping the refugees,” says fifth-grade student Addie Furr. “But it is really cool that it worked out like it did. The best part was seeing how children all across the world were doing small things to make a difference.”  The worldwide program is structured to guide students to address problems and devise solutions through four steps. The first encourages students to empathize with people facing a problem. The second step has them imagine what the problem’s solution could be; the third is to do something about it; and the fourth is to share that solution. Amanda Northrup, a fourth-and-fifth-grade teacher, spent weeks teaching her students how to conduct interviews during the first stage so they could better understand the people at hand and problems they face.When the students interviewed Ni Ni Myint, a 30-year-old wife, mother, and Burmese refugee, they came prepared with researched background information and honed interviewing skills. “We really wanted Ni Ni’s story to drive the students’ actions,” Northrup says. “In order for that to happen, we spent a lot of time teaching the students how to ask thoughtful and informative questions. We had a panel of three students lead the interview, and the rest of the team took notes and followed up with probing questions.”    Northrup’s instruction paid off. Even with the language barrier, Myint says she immediately felt comfortable sharing her struggles and needs with the group. “The team was so nice,” Myint says. With her harrowing recent experience, that was vital. “My family was forced to leave my country because it was dangerous. We were very hungry in Burma. No one could help us there.”  Since arriving in the U.S. four years ago, though, Myint told the students she’d been living with chronic stomach pains and gastrointestinal problems. She’s not alone. Many refugees suffer from similar health problems when their diet changes from freshly harvested, local produce to highly processed foods in the United States.  The interviews left an impact on the students. Schuyler Pettibone, now a sixth-grader, says, “I always thought the problems the refugees faced took place when they were in their home countries, or on their way to the United States. After interviewing the refugees, I learned that they also face many problems once they arrive here.” After interviewing Myint and other refugees, the students moved to the “imagine” stage of the process by brainstorming creative ways to provide fresh food for Myint and other refugees. No idea was too crazy or too small. Northrup led the students through a winnowing phase to determine feasibility. Eventually, they settled on their project. They would gather fresh produce from local farms and deliver the produce to Myint and her neighbors, also refugees.  After connecting with local farmers, the team spent an afternoon harvesting and bagging fresh kale. Fifth-grader Addie Furr says the experience was “awesome!” But actually delivering the fresh kale to Myint was her favorite part. “I will never forget the look on Ni Ni’s face when she opened the door and we were all there with fresh produce to help her feel better. That was just so cool.”  The students presented their project at the 2016 Scaling STEM conference in Raleigh as part of the program’s final stage, in which they share the results of their work. It was here that Design for Change USA director Sanjli Gidwaney heard their presentation. “Sanjli especially appreciated that the team listened carefully to the needs of the community and developed a targeted plan to meet that need,” says Exploris teacher and Design for Change leader Sonja McKay. “It is a simple project that anyone can replicate. Any volunteer can do this in an afternoon or a day.”    The global Design for Change leaders agreed with Gidwaney, naming Exploris’s work as the top project in the United States. Along with the award came the opportunity to attend the conference in Beijing.  “It was truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” says McKay. “The children were able to see how others across the world are taking simple steps to do good.” Clockwise from left: Leah Ruto, Sonja McKay, Schuyler Pettibone, Koren Morgan, Trevor Hatch, Annah Riedel, and Addie Furr in Beijing, China. Photograph by Sonja McKay.last_img read more

Story of a House Revival Living Tarboro

first_imgRevival Livingby Jesma Reynoldsphotographs by Catherine NguyenWhen Elizabeth Miller learned it was her turn to host Magazine Club last April, the pediatrician and mother of three realized her current living room furnishings – two small loveseats – might not accommodate the 20 ladies who comprise the membership of the venerable 100-year club in Tarboro. So she sent up an emergency flare to Eliza Stoecker and Louise Stowe in Raleigh. The sisters and Tarboro natives were already well acquainted with her gracious Greek Revival home, known as Cotton Valley. They’d long been friends with Miller’s husband Ken, who had grown up in the historic house and recently purchased it from his parents for his young and growing family. Fortuitously, Stoecker, Stowe, and business partner Christina Allen had recently expanded their services as owners of Fleur Boutique, a women’s designer clothing store in North Hills, to include interiors, so they were ready to jump in. For her part, Elizabeth was more than ready and willing to hand over entirely the task of redecorating. What began as work in one room quickly morphed into an entire house redo.After tackling the stately living room, where they added ethereal mint silk curtains strewn with birds, the Fleur trio moved to the family room, where they lacquered the walls in a deep peacock blue, a bold and modern approach. In the dining room, they hung wallpaper by Gracie, adding custom touches of peacock blue birds and birdcages to echo the family room walls. The light-filled kitchen was gutted and bedecked with custom cabinetry and oversized brass hardware. Fabrics throughout the rooms were chosen from Brunschwig & Fils, Schumacher, Zoffany, and Quadrille. Other punches of color – a zebra wallpaper in the powder room and pops of yellow on pillows – added a zing to gracious, important architecture. The overall effect is simultaneously timeless and vibrant. With three children ranging from 6 months to 7 years, that’s a good thing for the active two-doctor family who both practice in Rocky Mount. Elizabeth says her 15-minute commute home to the tranquility of Cotton Valley is transformative. Meanwhile, Ken, an orthodontist and onetime musician, enjoys caring for the extensive grounds, playing his guitar, and riding around in his golf cart with a glass of wine when he returns from work in the late afternoon, taking it all in, proving that you can indeed go home again.last_img read more