Wisburg High school graduates encouraged to pursue ICT careers

first_imgPublic Telecommunications Minister Cathy Hughes has charged the graduating class of the Wisburg Secondary School to consider careers in Information and Communications Technology (ICT).Graduates of the Wisburg Secondary SchoolThe Minister was at the time addressing the 17th Annual Graduation and Prize Giving Exercise of the Wisburg Secondary School on Wednesday.Minister Hughes told the students that Guyana was rapidly progressing with a brand-new business model that includes a focus on increased entrepreneurial activities; a new oil and gas (or hydrocarbon) industry; an expanded manufacturing sector; and a broader agricultural sector that includes agro-processing.“My point is that Information Technology is the key element of these industries.  In fact, ICT is important to every single industrial sector in these times we live in.”Minister Hughes advised the graduates to pursue higher education, whether it be at a university or technical/vocational institution or online.  She noted that across the board, secondary level students are turning in better performances in the subjects that are most needed in the world of work, and in the world of higher technology.“I want to remind you that “you are the chosen generation, because of the technological skills required in today’s world, you are naturally proficient in.  You know that minicomputer called a smart-phone better than I do. Many of you are creating apps, establishing your own small businesses, promoting your services and products on your Facebook page, Whatsapp and other social media applications,” Minister Hughes said.The graduation saw teachers, eager graduates and their proud parents gathered in the school’s auditorium to witness this rite of passage.last_img read more

Race for Democratic nomination not over yet, Obama emphasizes

first_imgThe Democratic presidential campaign, viewed in Iowa, is awash in uncertainties. Will Edwards, who started a 17-county bus tour on Friday, hold the supporters who propelled him to second place here in 2004? Will Obama turn his large crowds into real votes? Will Clinton’s national advantages assuage concern among some voters who worry how Republicans will go after her in a general election? Interviews with more than two dozen Democrats here this week suggest that the race remains remarkably unsettled, with voters voicing concern about Edwards’ viability, Obama’s experience and Clinton’s electability.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! NEW HAMPTON, Iowa – A broad grin spread across Sen. Barack Obama’s face as he turned to walk away from a city park here on Friday after shaking the last hand and posing for a final photograph with a clutch of supporters. Given the political news of the week, at least back in Washington, why the smile? “It’s not over!” Obama said, pausing for a moment to answer an open-ended question about the state of the campaign. “Presumably if they thought the race was over, they wouldn’t be taking the time to come to a town-hall meeting to talk about the presidential race.” If the chase for the Democratic nomination appears to have reached a stage of inevitability, if Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York is becoming a runaway front-runner, as national polls might suggest and some of her rivals are beginning to fear, the word has not reached the voters here in Chickasaw County. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityIt is not that the 200 or so people who turned out to see Obama on Friday morning were oblivious to such prognostications. As ardent political enthusiasts, many obsessively follow them. But the voters here have not necessarily become believers, particularly before they have their own chance to size up the competition when it comes to town. “The one thing about Iowa is that we always have the ability to bring a reality check to the country,” said Randall Rolph, 56, who came with his son to see Obama and plans to return Sunday when Clinton arrives for a campaign stop. Still, three months before the Iowa caucuses open the nominating contests on both sides of the ticket, a fresh sense of urgency is at hand for Obama as he tries to change the dynamic of the race. Clinton, who started the year perceived to be trailing Obama and former Sen. John Edwards in Iowa, has crept up in state polls. On a four-day tour through Iowa this week, Obama of Illinois continued to draw large crowds in city after city. He sharpened his message about his early opposition to the war, he devoted more time to voters’ questions, and he talked increasingly about the need for Democrats to choose a candidate who is honest, truthful and, ultimately, able to bring about change. With a newly crafted sales pitch, he acknowledged that he was “behind in the national polls,” and asked Iowans for their support. “If you’ve decided that you’re supporting me, don’t keep on waiting because it’s going to get chilly soon,” Obama said. “The fact is, all of you are going to decide who the next president of the United States is.” last_img read more