Researchers To Examine the Impact of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals

first_imgPosted on October 26, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On October 17th, Harvard School of Public Health featured a post, Researchers To Examine the Impact of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals, about a group of researchers who are exploring the impact of the Millennium Development Goals, with a close look at the implications of the inclusion of certain goals and the exclusion of other goals.From the post:In fact, say researchers Alicia Ely Yamin and Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, the MDGs’ focus on primary education effectively relegated some other worthy educational goals to the back burner, where they received less support—and less funding. Likewise, the other MDGs—aimed at addressing problems including poverty and hunger, maternal health, and child health—while admirable, also had unintended effects of marginalizing some issues that weren’t specifically mentioned in the list.“One of the powerful things about the MDGs is that they set very specific goals, like cutting the proportion of people living on less than a dollar a day by half, or reducing maternal mortality ratios by 75%,” said Fukuda-Parr. “These are all very important priorities and no one would disagree with them. But there are many other global goals that are important. So we need to ask, ‘What did the MDGs leave out?’ ”Yamin, lecturer on global health in the Department of Global Health and Population at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Director of the Health Rights of Women and Children Program at HSPH’s François-Xavier Bagnoud (FXB) Center for Health and Human Rights, and Fukuda-Parr, professor in the international affairs program at the New School in New York, are leading a group of 17 researchers in the international development and human rights communities in examining the consequences—both intended and unintended—of the MDGs.Read the full post here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara has opened it

first_imgAl Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara has opened its doors in the Sultanate of Oman bringing the luxury hospitality brand Anantara Hotels, Resorts & Spas to the stunning coastal location of Salalah in the southern province of Dhofar on the Arabian Sea.Situated between a scenic beach and a freshwater lagoon, bordering the historic Al Baleed UNESCO archaeological site, the resort introduces a new level of luxury and refinement to the region, allowing discerning guests to discover the unique charms of southern Oman.Conveniently located just 15 kilometres from Salalah International Airport, Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara sits within easy reach of an abundance of cultural treasures and thrilling escapades. Famed for the riches of its wadis dotted with frankincense, coconut-fringed beaches, a wealth of archaeological sites and a profusion of tropical greenery during the summer monsoon season, Salalah offers intrepid travellers a unique destination of natural beauty.Guarded by the Dhofar mountains and edged by the shimmering blue waters of the Arabian Sea, the resort has been designed with the simple grandeur of the region’s iconic coastal fortresses in mind. Striking architecture is surrounded by tropical gardens, with walkways framed by 750 coconut palms and eye-catching water features to create an atmosphere of tranquillity.The resort comprises 136 guest rooms and villas offering views of the ocean, lagoon or gardens. The 40 premier and deluxe rooms offer luxurious handcrafted furnishings and rich textures, whilst the eight one-bedroom villas and 88 one- and two-bedroom pool villas entice with personalised villa host services and separate living areas. The pool villas invite with private temperature-controlled swimming pools, the first of their kind in Salalah.Three exquisite dining venues showcase an array of vibrant cuisines. All-day dining restaurant Sakalan presents world flavours served by open kitchens, while Asian restaurant Mekong takes guests on a journey along the legendary river with vibrant Thai, Chinese and Vietnamese cuisine. Al Mina, a relaxed Mediterranean beach bar and restaurant serves well-crafted cocktails, barbecue delights and shisha.Rooted in Thai philosophy with influences from Arabia, the world-acclaimed Anantara Spa takes guests on a holistic journey, offering the only hammam in Salalah alongside rejuvenating treatments using indigenous ingredients such as pomegranate, coconut and frankincense. The resort also offers wellness programmes that are customised for each individual’s lifestyle with options including weight management, revitalisation, relaxation and de-stressing, detox, general wellbeing and rejuvenation that run over three, five or seven days.Guests also benefit from a state-of-the-art fitness centre, water sports centre, tennis court, beach volleyball court and infinity pool. A separate kids’ and teens’ club offers fun-filled activities, while the Safar Boardroom and Al Hosn Ballroom host business meetings, conferences and intimate weddings for up to 120 guests.During their stay, guests can enjoy an array of authentic experiences, from hiking up rocky cliffs to catching fish for dinner, saluting the sunset during a yoga session or simply slipping out of their beachfront villa into the ocean.Situated in the heart of the 6000-year-old Frankincense Trail, there is plenty for those with a passion for culture and history to discover such as visiting ancient ruins and heritage sites or sauntering around a souk. Meanwhile an array of thrilling experiences allow guests to explore the fort-dotted mountains, rugged wadis and pristine beaches, with active travellers well served by diving, trekking, kite surfing and fishing.last_img read more